Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm used to using synchronous sockets. In order to deal with messages that have not completely arrived yet, I'd set the first 4 bytes to be the expected length of the message. Then I'd use Socket.Receive(tcpRecv, 1024, SocketFlags.Peek); to take a look at the message without pulling it off the buffer. If all of it was there, I'd pull the data. If it wasn't, I'd leave it there. I had designed my protocol so that no message would ever be greater than 1024 bytes.

In asynchronous sockets, I don't see a way to peek at the data. Is there a way to do this? Is there a better approach to this than peeking at the data?

Thanks.

-Nick

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't need to peek: .NET asynchronous sockets allow you to achieve the same type of functionality without peeking. I think you might be looking for something like this:

private void BeginReceive()
{
    if ( _clientState == EClientState.Receiving)
    {
        if (_asyncTask.BytesReceived != 0 && _asyncTask.TotalBytesReceived <= _maxPageSize)
        {
            SocketAsyncEventArgs e = new SocketAsyncEventArgs();
            e.SetBuffer(_asyncTask.ReceiveBuffer, 0, _asyncTask.ReceiveBuffer.Length);
            e.Completed += new EventHandler<SocketAsyncEventArgs>(ReceiveCallback);
            e.UserToken = _asyncTask.Host;

            bool comletedAsync = false;
            try
            {
                comletedAsync = _socket.ReceiveAsync(e);
            }
            catch (SocketException se)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Error receiving data from: " + _asyncTask.Host);
                Console.WriteLine("SocketException: {0} Error Code: {1}", se.Message, se.NativeErrorCode);

                ChangeState(EClientState.Failed);
            }

            if (!comletedAsync)
            {
                // The call completed synchronously so invoke the callback ourselves
                ReceiveCallback(this, e);
            }
        }
        else
        {
            //Console.WriteLine("Num bytes received: " + _asyncTask.TotalBytesReceived);
            ChangeState(EClientState.ReceiveDone);
        }
    }
}

When you get the callback you can schedule another receive:

private void ReceiveCallback(object sender, SocketAsyncEventArgs args)
{
    lock (_sync) // re-entrant lock
    {
        // Fast fail: should not be receiving data if the client
        // is not in a receiving state.
        if (_clientState == EClientState.Receiving)
        {
            String host = (String)args.UserToken;

            if (_asyncTask.Host == host && args.SocketError == SocketError.Success)
            {
                try
                {
                    Encoding encoding = Encoding.ASCII;
                    _asyncTask.BytesReceived = args.BytesTransferred;
                    _asyncTask.TotalBytesReceived += _asyncTask.BytesReceived;
                    _asyncTask.DocSource += encoding.GetString(_asyncTask.ReceiveBuffer, 0, _asyncTask.BytesReceived);

                    BeginReceive();
                }
                catch (SocketException e)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Error receiving data from: " + host);
                    Console.WriteLine("SocketException: {0} Error Code: {1}", e.Message, e.NativeErrorCode);

                    ChangeState(EClientState.Failed);
                }
            }
            else if (_asyncTask.Host != host)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Warning: received a callback for {0}, but the client is currently working on {1}.",
                    host, _asyncTask.Host);
            }
            else
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Socket Error: {0} when receiving from {1}",
                   args.SocketError,
                   _asyncTask.Host);
                ChangeState(EClientState.Failed);
            }
        }
    }
}

You can see the entire asynchronous client on my blog: http://codesprout.blogspot.com/2011/04/asynchronous-http-client.html

share|improve this answer

Your same data flow works without peeking:

  • schedule a four byte read
  • when it completes, save it in the buffer and decode it into length "n"
  • schedule a read of length "n" - 4
  • when it completes, append it to the four bytes already there
  • decode your message

The only difference from peeking is that you have to save the four bytes when you initially read them.

share|improve this answer
1  
Bear in mind that you do have to handle partial read completions, so the code actually gets rather complex. I have a class on my blog which implements a 4-byte length prefix. –  Stephen Cleary May 6 '11 at 4:00
    
@Stephen Cleary: Yes, presumably he had the same issue with the old code as well as Berkeley sockets also do partial reads. "You don't always get what you want, but if you try sometimes, ..." –  Rick Sladkey May 6 '11 at 4:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.