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I need to code like this:

public static T GetValue(this SerializationInfo si, string name,Type T)
{
    return (T) si.GetValue(name, typeof (T));
}

I already know that the following code can work properly

public static T GetValue<T>(this SerializationInfo si, string name)
{
    return (T) si.GetValue(name, typeof (T));
}

and my code is in c#, can anyone help?

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2  
What is the question? –  David Heffernan May 6 '11 at 3:39
    
why do you need that extra parameter? It's not needed - or are you trying to write a non-generic version? –  BrokenGlass May 6 '11 at 3:40
    
Why do you need to code like this? –  Matt Mitchell May 6 '11 at 3:46
    
ok, the reason why i need to code like this : –  BeastToHuman May 6 '11 at 11:06
    
ok, the reason why i need to code like this :In my class which implemnts ISerilizable has many fields to store/retrive, I first write store phase like this, ..(...){info.AddValue("myfield",myfield); ...}.And I want to get the retrieve codes automatically. currently I have used Regex Editor to retrive that in this way : $2 = info.GetValue<double>("$1"); ... ok , the "<double>" cannot be replaced automatically. so I need the retrieve code like this : $2 = info.GetValue("$1", typeof ($1)); Is that clear? Is there an alternative way? any help will be appreciated! Thank you for reply! –  BeastToHuman May 6 '11 at 11:17

3 Answers 3

The return type T in the first example does not refer to any valid type: T in that case is simply the name of a parameter passed to the method.

You either know the type at design time or you don't, and if you don't then your only choice is to return the type Object, or some other base type or interface.

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it will work if the class is generic i.e. SomeClass<T> –  CRice May 6 '11 at 3:52
1  
Extension methods cannot be defined in generic classes, so no, it won't work. –  Quick Joe Smith May 6 '11 at 9:53

No you cannot do that, because generics are assessed at compilation (and you are asking for dynamic generics). Can you provide some more context on the usage?

How are you getting your t parameter to pass to your desired example? If it's simply by typeof(int) as a parameter, then why not use the generic exmaple?

Consider this example:

Type t = GetTypeInfoBasedOnNameInAFile();
int a = GetValue(someSerializationInfo, "PropertyName", t);

How can the compiler know that Type t is going to be castable to int at runtime?

What you could do is have GetValue return an Object and then:

Type t = GetTypeInfoBasedOnNameInAFile();
int a = (int)GetValue(someSerializationInfo, "PropertyName", t);

But of course, if you are doing that it implies you know the expected types at compile time, so why not just use a generic parameter.

You can perhaps achieve what you are after (I'm not sure on the context/usage) by using dynamic variables.

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ok, the reason why i need to code like this :In my class which implemnts ISerilizable has many fields to store/retrive, I first write store phase like this, ..(...){info.AddValue("myfield",myfield); ...}.And I want to get the retrieve codes automatically. currently I have used Regex Editor to retrive that in this way : $2 = info.GetValue<double>("$1"); ... ok , the "<double>" cannot be replaced automatically. so I need the retrieve code like this : $2 = info.GetValue("$1", typeof ($1)); Is that clear? Is there an alternative way? any help will be appreciated! Thank you for reply! –  BeastToHuman May 6 '11 at 11:47
    
@BeastToHuman - okay, but how do you actually use that value once you have got it? For instance, do you do double b = info.GetValue("$1");? If so, you can simply give double as a type at this stage. If you are just doing var b = info.GetValue("$1"); are you using b at any stage? If so, you must be assuming it is a certain type at this stage, so why not provide that type at the GetValue call? –  Matt Mitchell May 8 '11 at 23:44
    
okay, thanks ! Maybe provide the type is the only way! –  BeastToHuman May 9 '11 at 21:46

You can do a runtime conversion to a type:

Convert.ChangeType(sourceObject, destinationType);

I believe that is the syntax. Of course, this will throw an exception if the cast is not possible.

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