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Our previous programmer set the wrong collation in a table (Mysql). He set it up with Latin collation, when it should be UTF8, and now I have issues. Every record with Chinese and Japan character turn to ??? character.

Is possible to change collation and get back the detail of character?

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possible duplicate of MySql alter table Collation –  kenorb Mar 3 at 14:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 103 down vote accepted

change database collation:

ALTER DATABASE <database_name> CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci;

change table collation:

ALTER TABLE <table_name> CONVERT TO CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci;

change column collation:

ALTER TABLE <table_name> MODIFY <column_name> VARCHAR(255) CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci;

More info:

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Beware CHARACTER SET utf8 will default to utf8_general_ci but you can also define the collation like this ALTER DATABASE <database_name> CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci; if needed –  KCD Feb 17 '14 at 8:10
    
...and I recommend you test it create table testit(a varchar(1)); show create table testit \G drop table testit; –  KCD Feb 17 '14 at 8:13
    
Thank you @Timo Huovinen, the commands work like charm :D –  Romans 8.38-39 Jun 3 '14 at 17:40
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@Romans8.38-39 I'm very glad that I helped! –  Timo Huovinen Jun 3 '14 at 19:59
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Just want to mention that the second will change the collation to utf8_general_ci; if you want to change it to utf8_unicode_ci, you can define collation: ALTER TABLE <table_name> CONVERT TO CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci;. This works on tables exactly the same as it works on databases, as @KCD has pointed out. –  wiser Apr 28 at 4:01

here describes the process well. However, some of the characters that didn't fit in latin space are gone forever. UTF-8 is a SUPERSET of latin1. Not the reverse. Most will fit in single byte space, but any undefined ones will not (check a list of latin1 - not all 256 characters are defined, depending on mysql's latin1 definition)

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Heres how to change all databases/tables/columns. Run these queries and they will output all of the subsequent queries necessary to convert your entire schema to utf8. Hope this helps!

-- Change DATABASE Default Collation

SELECT DISTINCT concat('ALTER DATABASE ', TABLE_SCHEMA, ' CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci;')
from information_schema.tables
where TABLE_SCHEMA like  'database_name';

-- Change TABLE Collation / Char Set

SELECT concat('ALTER TABLE ', TABLE_SCHEMA, '.', table_name, ' CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci;')
from information_schema.tables
where TABLE_SCHEMA like 'database_name';

-- Change COLUMN Collation / Char Set

SELECT concat('ALTER TABLE ', t1.TABLE_SCHEMA, '.', t1.table_name, ' MODIFY ', t1.column_name, ' ', t1.data_type , '(' , CHARACTER_MAXIMUM_LENGTH , ')' , ' CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci;')
from information_schema.columns t1
where t1.TABLE_SCHEMA like 'database_name' and CHARACTER_SET_NAME = ‘old_charset_name';
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Beware that in Mysql, the utf8 character set is only a subset of the real UTF8 character set. In order to save one byte of storage, the Mysql team decided to store only three bytes of a UTF8 characters instead of the full four-bytes. That means that some east asian language and emoji aren't fully supported. To make sure you can store all UTF8 characters, use the utf8mb4 data type, and utf8mb4_bin or utf8mb4_general_ci in Mysql.

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