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I'm working on a website wherein the "home" page for a user includes some data for use by some extensive JavaScript code. Currently the data is encoded as a JSON object in a script tag at the end of the document body and a GUI control object is instantiated just afterwards so that it has access to both the DOM and the JSON object. I like this structure because it allows the page to load quickly. It looks something like this:

<body>
  <script type="text/javascript" src="mylib.js"></script>
  <div>...lots of DOM and text content...</div>
  <script type="text/javascript">
    var userData = {...}; // Encoded by HTTP response handler.
    $(document).ready(function() {
      // GUI object which modifies form controls, etc.
      new MyGuiObject(userData, document.form.myForm);
    };
  </script>
</body>

However, new functionality might require the userData object to be returned as a separate HTTP request, which means the inline form would be a duplicate (and violation of the DRY principle). It's tempting to refactor the above code to use that AJAX request for the userData but it introduces yet another HTTP request for data we know is needed (and available) immediately.

Is it worth changing the code to use the userData retrieved from an AJAX call? If so, what is a best practice for encoding the URL from which the data is retrieved (considering that it would be better dynamically generated by the web framework)?

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var userData = {...}; That's not a JSON object. That's a JavaScript object (using JavaScript's object literal notation, of which JSON is a subset). –  T.J. Crowder May 6 '11 at 6:01
    
@TJ: right, thanks for the clarification, I'll edit the question. –  maerics May 6 '11 at 6:07
    
My pedantry is showing. ;-) –  T.J. Crowder May 6 '11 at 6:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is it worth changing the code to use the userData retrieved from an AJAX call?

I wouldn't have thought so, but this is going to be a matter of opinion and somewhat dependent on your overall environment. It's a judgement call.

Provided you have underlying code that generates the object (whether within the initial script element or later in response to the ajax call), you're not violating the DRY principle.

If the HTML page on which that appears is completely static (and therefore cacheable), then you'd be repeating yourself as you'd have to first have the object in the HTML, then again create it with a dynamic response to an ajax request. But if the initial HTML is already dynamically-generated, then just use a central function to generate the object in both cases. (The function can generate a string in JSON format, then on the HTML page just output that with var userData = in front of it, since JSON is a subset of JavaScript object literal format and so you can drop it into script where an object literal is valid.)

DRY or not, I'd be loathe to add an avoidable HTTP request to my page load.

If so, what is a best practice for encoding the URL from which the data is retrieved...

I'm not entirely sure what you mean by encoding the URL. If you mean the response containing the JSON, just send it back with Content-Type: application/json. jQuery will understand that and deserialize it into an object for you before handing it to your success function.

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However, new functionality might require the userData object to be returned as a separate HTTP request, which means the inline form would be a duplicate (and violation of the DRY principle). It's tempting to refactor the above code to use that AJAX request for the userData but it introduces yet another HTTP request for data we know is needed (and available) immediately.

An inline form is not necessarily duplicating information. It allows the user to begin seeing the object, and depending on the extra information you are providing, it may allow your application to continue to work if the user has disabled JavaScript (since JavaScript is supposedly supposed to only enhance an application, though I know practically speaking that is hardly possible with modern applications anymore). But the immediate ability to view the form (or parts of the form) is an advantage.

So DRY should not mean dumbing down something to the point of making the application lack in performance or responsiveness. These goals may often be in tension, but you have to come to a happy middle ground. Admittedly, sometimes ease of maintenance may justify a little bit of performance penalty, but in most cases you probably do not wish your users to suffer for that reason.

Is it worth changing the code to use the userData retrieved from an AJAX call?

It sounds like you're saying above that it will be required, no? If so, why do you need it to be asynchronously received? Are you grabbing data from another site and you wish to get the contents out to the user as quick as possible and then update them with that additional information? Otherwise, for optimal performance, it will probably be better to provide the user data directly to the user rather than having them wait for the Ajax reply, since Ajax is best used for data needed later in the application, especially given IE < 8's limitations in handling more than 2 simultaneous connections.

If you do need the Ajax, maybe you can provide some information on load, and then utilize the additional Ajax-returned data later.

If so, what is a best practice for encoding the URL from which the data is retrieved (considering that it would be better dynamically generated by the web framework)?

By encoding the URL, what do you mean exactly?

Do you mean encoding the characters of the URL? In Core JavaScript, that is typically done with encodeURIComponent(), though in jQuery this may be handled for you in such methods as serialize() and jQuery.param(), with the former for serializing an existing form into an encoded URL, and the latter for getting an array or object into the URL-encoded format.

If you mean deciding between GET or POST, GET should be used if your retrieval has no side effects on the server, while POST in most cases is what you should use otherwise.

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