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I have to do some int -> byte conversion and switch to big endian for some MIDI data I'm writing. Right now, I'm doing it like:

int tempo = 500000;
char* a = (char*)&tempo;

//reverse it
inverse(a, 3);

[myMutableData appendBytes:a length:3];

and the inverse function:

void inverse(char inver_a[],int j)
{
    int i,temp;
    j--;
    for(i=0;i<(j/2);i++)
    {
      temp=inver_a[i];
      inver_a[i]=inver_a[j];
      inver_a[j]=temp;
       j--;
     }
}

It works, but it's not real clean, and I don't like that I'm having to specify 3 both times (since I have the luxury of knowing how many bytes it will end up).

Is there a more convenient way I should be approaching this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Use the Core Foundation byte swapping functions.

int32_t unswapped = 0x12345678;
int32_t swapped = CFSwapInt32HostToBig(unswapped);
char* a = (char*) &swapped;
[myMutableData appendBytes:a length:sizeof(int32_t)];
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Okay - this looks great -- but I'm having trouble with my limited C skills setting it up. Can you help out with a line of code sample. Call swap on tempo? And where does the conversion to char* come in? –  jn_pdx May 6 '11 at 7:47
    
@jn_pdx: see edited answer –  JeremyP May 6 '11 at 8:13
int tempo = 500000;

//reverse it
inverse(&tempo);

[myMutableData appendBytes:(char*)tempo length:sizeof(tempo)];

and the inverse function:

void inverse(int *value)
{
    char inver_a = (char*)value;
    int j = sizeof(*value); //or u can put 2
    int i,temp;
    // commenting this j--;
    for(i=0;i<(j/2);i++)
    {
      temp=inver_a[i];
      inver_a[i]=inver_a[j];
      inver_a[j]=temp;
       j--;
     }
}
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throws a EXC_BAD_ACCESS error. –  jn_pdx May 6 '11 at 7:35
    
Also doesn't accomplish anything; value is not passed by reference and the reversed copy isn't returned. –  Josh Caswell May 6 '11 at 7:47
    
ok updated the code,,,,and where is bad access is comming...?? –  Inder Kumar Rathore May 6 '11 at 9:03
    
was a result of passing tempo without the reference –  jn_pdx May 6 '11 at 9:25

This should do the trick:

/*
  Quick swap of Endian.    
*/

#include <stdio.h>

int main(){

  unsigned int number = 0x04030201;
  char *p1, *p2;
  int i;

    p1 = (char *) &number;
    p2 = (p1 + 3);


  for (i=0; i<2; i++){
      *p1 ^= *p2;
      *p2 ^= *p1;
      *p1 ^= *p2;
  }


return 0;   
}

You can pack it into a function in whatever way you want to use it. The bitwise swap should compile into some pretty neat assembly :)

Hope it helps :)

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