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The answer to this little question will clear everything up for me.

If have a form tag that has a Get method and an action of some random script. When I hit the submit button on the page, the Get Method is sent to HTTP and HTTP is what appends the query string to the url, the HTTP then returns a 20X status if the response is good and a 40X is a bad response? And our action goes to our webserver to run the script?

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3 Answers 3

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You are sending your form's data via HTTP using the "get" request. HTTP is a protocol and not a server. Your request is handled by a server who knows how to handle the HTTP protocol, eg. Apache. The server processes the data and sends back a response. As you mention there are different kind of responses. 404 is best known (document not found).

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HTTP is transport and HTML is content. The Form submit calls a GET or POST request on the server depending on the action defined for the HTML form. The Form's arguments are appended by the Browser's form logic to the HTTP request, depending whehter GET or POST is used, they are attached to the request URL or put into the request body.

Then the request is handled on the server and the result is returned by the server logic (which can be a CGI, some perl script, a J2EE application etc.).

The server seponds with a HTTP status code (where everything below 300 is a success, and everything above 399 is an error - see here:HTTP staus codes ).

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The script is not run on the server, it is run on the client (the browser).

HTML is the markup code that describes the structure of the page. Browsers interpet the HTML code they receive and construct your page from it. Check here for more details: Wikipedia: HTML

The HTTP is the protocol used by the browser to talk to the server. Check this for more details: Wikipedia again: HTTP

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