Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to get a fixed length list from another list like:

a = ['a','b','c']
b = [0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0]

And I want to get a list like this: ['a','b','c',0,0,0,0,0,0,0]. In other words, if len(a) < len(b), i want to fill up list a with values from list b up to length of the list b, somewhat similar to what str.ljust does.

This is my code:

a=['a','b','c']
b = [0 for i in range(5)]
b = [a[i] for i in b if a[i] else i]

print a

But it shows error:

  File "c.py", line 7
    b = [a[i] for i in b if a[i] else i]
                                    ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

What can i do?

share|improve this question
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 37 down vote accepted

Why not just:

a = a + [0]*(maxLen - len(a))
share|improve this answer
    
This works well for immutable objects (like 0) but won't work for mutable objects. [0 for i in range(maxlen-len(a)] works for both immutable and mutable objects. –  S.Lott May 6 '11 at 11:33
1  
As the original poster asked for zeros, that should not be a problem. And you example works only for mutable objects, if you make sure that you create a new one for each i. I you just replace the 0 with another variable, you will have the same problem. –  Achim May 6 '11 at 13:35
add comment

Use itertools repeat.

>>> from itertools import repeat
>>> a + list(repeat(0, 6))
['a', 'b', 'c', 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
share|improve this answer
add comment

Why not just

c = (a + b)[:len(b)]
share|improve this answer
add comment

Can't you just do:

a = ['a','b','c']
b = [0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0]

c = a + b #= ['a','b','c',0,0,0,0,0,0,0]
share|improve this answer
    
the b's length is fixed . –  zjm1126 May 6 '11 at 7:59
    
Having a fixed length is no problem for concatenating lists. –  recursive May 6 '11 at 14:21
1  
The result for your example should be ['a', 'b', 'c', 0, 0, 0, 0] in order to match the OP's requirement. –  dansalmo Jun 28 '13 at 17:29
add comment

Try:

b = [a[i] if a[i] else i for i in b]

I think the for x in y if z syntax doesn't allow an else.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you want to fill with mutable values, for example with dicts:

map(lambda x: {}, [None] * n)

Where n is the number of elements in the array.

>>> map(lambda x: {}, [None] * 14)
[{}, {}, {}, {}, {}, {}, {}, {}, {}, {}, {}, {}, {}, {}]
>>> l = map(lambda x: {}, [None] * 14)
>>> l[0]
{}
>>> l[0]['bar'] = 'foo'
>>> l
[{'bar': 'foo'}, {}, {}, {}, {}, {}, {}, {}, {}, {}, {}, {}, {}, {}]

Populating without the lambda would cause every element to be {'bar': 'foo'}!

share|improve this answer
add comment

To be more explicit, this solution replaces the first elements of b with all of the elements of a regardless of the values in a or b:

a + b[len(a):]

This will also work with:

>>> a = ['a', ['b'], None, False]
>>> b = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> a + b[len(a):]
['a', ['b'], None, False, 4, 5] 

If you do not want to the result to be longer than b:

>>> a = ['a', ['b'], None, False]
>>> b = [0, 1, 2]
>>> (a + b[len(a):])[:len(b)]
['a', ['b'], None]
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.