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I'm attempting to use std::find_if on a std::map, looking for a particular object that matches a string as follows:

class MyString
{
public:
    MyString() {}
    MyString(const std::string& x) : m_x(x) {}
    const std::string& value() const
    {
            return m_x;
    }

private:
    std::string m_x;
};

std::map<int,MyString> squaresS;
std::map<int,MyString>::iterator iIt;

squaresS[1] = MyString("1");
squaresS[2] = MyString("4");
squaresS[3] = MyString("9");
const std::string sTarget = "4";

iIt = std::find_if(squaresS.begin(), squaresS.end(),
    boost::bind(std::equal_to<std::string>(),
        boost::bind(&MyString::value,
            boost::bind(&std::map<int,MyString>::value_type::second, _1)),
        sTarget));

if (iIt != squaresS.end())
    std::cout << "Found " << iIt->second.value() << std::endl;
else
    std::cout << "Not Found" << std::endl;

The result of executing this code is Not Found; I expected Found 4 to be output. However, if I do roughly the same thing using integers then it works i.e. the output is Found 4:

class MyInteger
{
public:
    MyInteger() {}
    MyInteger(int x) : m_x(x) {}
    int value() const
    {
        return m_x;
    }

private:
    int m_x;
};

std::map<int,MyInteger> squaresI;
std::map<int,MyInteger>::iterator sIt;

squaresI[1] = MyInteger(1);
squaresI[2] = MyInteger(4);
squaresI[3] = MyInteger(9);
int iTarget = 4;

sIt = std::find_if(squaresI.begin(), squaresI.end(),
    boost::bind(std::equal_to<int>(),
        boost::bind(&MyInteger::value,
            boost::bind(&std::map<int,MyInteger>::value_type::second, _1)),
        iTarget));

if (sIt != squaresI.end())
    std::cout << "Found " << sIt->second.value() << std::endl;
else
    std::cout << "Not Found" << std::endl;

I suspect it is something to do with std::equal_to but I'm unsure how to go about fixing this.

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7  
Irrelevant comment: sometimes I'm just amazed on how bad one can get intoxicated by this sort of horrible unreadable syntax one little step after another. Sort of a boiling frog story about boost, probably. –  6502 May 6 '11 at 8:05
1  
@6502, I hear you... a simple functor would be significantly more understandable that this bind magic... <sigh/> –  Nim May 6 '11 at 8:07
    
Actually your code above for MyString workds for me: ideone.com/DZ0lx, you should still add a proper copy constructor though! –  Nim May 6 '11 at 8:09
1  
@Nim: Agreed. C++0x is practically here, and there are precious few reasons to avoid the new features in new code. Of course, I am a bit afraid of the kind of code people will write with algorithm and lambdas when a for would suffice: think of what jQuery has done to JavaScript development and you'll see what I mean. –  Jon Purdy May 6 '11 at 8:28
    
Your code for MyString works for me as well with gcc-4.2.1 –  Serge May 6 '11 at 8:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As noted by others, your code already works for me (VC++ 2010 SP1). That said, there is a trivial change that can be made to reduce the number of nested binds -- the return types of boost::bind (unlike those of std::bind) have all relational and logical operators overloaded including operator==, obviating (or at least mitigating) the need for adapters like std::equal_to<>. Taking advantage of this simplifies your code to something like:

typedef std::map<int, MyString> squares_t;
squares_t::const_iterator iIt = std::find_if(
    squaresS.begin(),
    squaresS.end(),
    boost::bind(
        &MyString::value,
        boost::bind(&squares_t::value_type::second, ::_1)
    ) == sTarget
);

See the Boost.Bind docs for more info.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I was using VC++ 2005 to compile this so time for an upgrade I think! I like your use of operator()==. –  randusr836 May 7 '11 at 9:04

Here is what you could do:

class MyString
{
public:
    MyString() {}
    MyString(const std::string& x) : m_x(x) {}
    const std::string& value() const
    {
            return m_x;
    }

private:
    std::string m_x;
};

class mystringmatch
{
   MyString _target;
public:
   mystringmatch(const MyString& target):_target(target)
   {
   }

   bool operator()(const std::pair<int, MyString>& src) const
   {
      return src.second.value() == _target.value();
   }
};

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
   std::map<int,MyString> squaresS;
   std::map<int,MyString>::iterator iIt;

   squaresS[1] = MyString("1");
   squaresS[2] = MyString("4");
   squaresS[3] = MyString("9");
   const std::string sTarget = "4";

   iIt = std::find_if(squaresS.begin(), squaresS.end(), mystringmatch(sTarget));

   if (iIt != squaresS.end())
       std::cout << "Found " << iIt->second.value() << std::endl;
   else
       std::cout << "Not Found" << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

In my opinion, this kind of code makes people shift from C++ to other languages. It's nearly impossible to read.

sIt = std::find_if(squaresI.begin(), squaresI.end(),
    boost::bind(std::equal_to<int>(),
        boost::bind(&MyInteger::value,
            boost::bind(&std::map<int,MyInteger>::value_type::second, _1)),
        iTarget));
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