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In a shell script I have a variable $PATH which could look like this: /foo8232/test874-ab/bar/test-82-x. I now want to get a substring of this, getting as a result test-82-x in this specific case.

Thus I have to match the occurrences of /test.*, but only the last element OR from the end of the string. Whatever works best.

Any help on this?

Edit: Thanks for providing so many solutions so quickly. A few of them don't work though. Not sure, but maybe the problem is, that my path actually has whitespaces and more looks like this: /foo12323/test34 - 343bar/test - 234/test - 4323.txt. Sorry that I didn't mentioned it in the first place, if that causes troubles.

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2  
Aside: don't call your variable PATH. That will affect which commands can be run. –  Mikel May 6 '11 at 9:11
    
True. Thanks :-) –  znq May 6 '11 at 9:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For your specific path management, you've got the basename function :

basename /foo8232/test874-ab/bar/test-82-x
>>> test-82-x

or in a script :

#!/bin/bash
fullfilename=$(basename $1)
extension=${fullfilename##*.}
filename=${fullfilename%.*}

echo "fullfilename=$fullfilename"
echo "extension=$extension"
echo "filename=$filename"

which gives :

./file_name.sh /foo8232/test874-ab/bar/test-82-x
fullfilename=test-82-x
extension=
filename=test-82-x
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Thanks for the hint with basename. That works perfectly. –  znq May 6 '11 at 9:47

So you're looking for the last directory component that starts with test.

How about

IFS=/
for dir in $PATH; do
    case $dir in test*)
        match=$dir;;
    esac
done
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The following should be POSIX-compliant

BASE=$(basename $PATH)
if echo $BASE | grep "^test.*" > /dev/null; then
  # do something awesome
fi
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Thanks for the hint with basename. That's a very simple solution :-) –  znq May 6 '11 at 9:48

The last path element containing test could also be found with sed:

elem=$(echo $PATH | sed -r 's#.*/(test[^/]*).*#\1#')

Or without -r (using extended regular expressions):

elem=$(echo $PATH | sed 's#.*/\(test[^/]*\).*#\1#')
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Unfortunately Mac OS X sed doesn't have -r. –  znq May 6 '11 at 9:34
    
OK - I think I can change the command to use POSIX syntax. –  bmk May 6 '11 at 9:36
    
Thanks for the update. Still doesn't work, but maybe because I've whitespaces in my path. Updated the question. Sorry for that. –  znq May 6 '11 at 9:47
    
Actually this should not be a problem. –  bmk May 6 '11 at 9:51
1  
echo "/foo12323/test34 - 343bar/test - 234/test - 4323.txt" | sed 's#.*/\(test[^/]*\).*#\1#' gives me test - 4323.txt . –  bmk May 6 '11 at 9:59

echo pwd | awk -F \/ '{print $NF}'|grep test

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Doesn't work for me, but maybe because I've whitespaces in my path. Updated the question. Sorry for that. –  znq May 6 '11 at 9:48
    
why echo pwd ? That will just print "pwd". Unless you mean echo `pwd`, but that's just the same as just pwd. Supposedly that should've been echo $PATH (as the variable in the question is called) –  nash May 6 '11 at 14:32

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