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I am currently developing a customizable form script, and my users will be able to create new fields into their custom forms.

How to make a MySQL table structure for it? And if you know YAML, it would be helpful?

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3 Answers 3

A rough outline...

Table: user

  • user_id
  • email_address
  • password

Table: form

  • form_id
  • user_id
  • title
  • active

Table: field

  • field_id
  • form_id
  • name
  • type

This is a simple schema based on One User having Multiple Forms, and One Form having Multiple Fields. You can, of course, add fields to these suggested fields, really the only essential fields are the ones ending in "_id".

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Thank you Lucanos, that gave me an idea. –  dino May 6 '11 at 9:38
User:
  columns:
    user_id:  { type: integer, primary: true, notnull: true }
    email:    { type: string(80) }
    password: { type: string(80) }

Form:
  columns:
    form_id:   { type: integer, primary: true, notnull: true }
    user_id:   { type: integer, notnull: true }
    title:     { type: string(80) }
    is_active: { type: boolean, notnull: true, default: 1 }
  relations:
    User:      { onDelete: CASCADE, local: user_id, foreign: user_id, foreignAlias: Forms }

Field:
  columns:
    field_id:    { type: integer, primary: true, notnull: true }
    form_id:     { type: integer, notnull: true }
    field_name:  { type: string(80) }
    field_type:  { type: enum, values: [ String, Integer, Float, LongText, Boolean] }
    field_value: { type: string(80) }
  relations:
    Form:        { onDelete: CASCADE, local: form_id, foreign: form_id, foreignAlias: Fields }

The MySQL database generated by above YAML:

CREATE TABLE field (
field_id bigint(20) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
form_id bigint(20) NOT NULL,
field_name varchar(80) DEFAULT NULL,
field_type enum('String','Integer','Float','LongText','Boolean') DEFAULT NULL,
field_value varchar(80) DEFAULT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (field_id),
KEY form_id_idx (form_id),
CONSTRAINT field_form_id_form_form_id FOREIGN KEY (form_id) REFERENCES form (form_id) ON DELETE CASCADE
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

CREATE TABLE form (
form_id bigint(20) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
user_id bigint(20) NOT NULL,
title varchar(80) DEFAULT NULL,
is_active tinyint(1) NOT NULL DEFAULT '1',
PRIMARY KEY (form_id),
KEY user_id_idx (user_id),
CONSTRAINT form_user_id_user_user_id FOREIGN KEY (user_id) REFERENCES user (user_id) ON DELETE CASCADE
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

CREATE TABLE user (
user_id bigint(20) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
email varchar(80) DEFAULT NULL,
password varchar(80) DEFAULT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (user_id)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

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I think, you use this only for schema (or structure) of form, right? How to use this? –  dino May 8 '11 at 8:23
    
I found a tutorial. I think, you meant that: doctrine-project.org/projects/orm/1.2/docs/manual/… –  dino May 8 '11 at 8:27

Do you want the users to change the table structure? This would mean that you'd need to execute a mysql alter query, maybe like

 ALTER TABLE the_table DROP COLUMN one_column

or

 ALTER TABLE the_table ADD COLUMN another_column

And you'd want to wrap this in something that checked the table structure before executing this query. Having run the alter table queries you could then do the data management.

I think the best way to check the table structure before altering it would be to view the system tables

SELECT table_name, column_name, is_nullable, data_type, character_maximum_length
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.Columns
WHERE table_name = 'the_table'

This will return the information about all the columns in this table.

Does this help?

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No, I don't need the users to change table structure. I meant customizable forms. Thanks though Jim! Any advice is always welcomed in my realm. –  dino May 6 '11 at 9:37

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