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In JS, we can write closure like:

function f(){
var a=0;
function g(){
    alert(a++);
}
return g;
}
g=f()
g()

However, if I write following code in python

def f():
    a=0
    def g():
        a+=1
        print a
    return g
g=f()
g()

Then I get UnboundedLocalError.

Can anyone tell me the difference between closure in python and JS?

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3  
Do you really believe that this difference will explain what you're seeing? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 6 '11 at 10:38
    
I think so. Direct explanation of the observed result is also welcome –  user607722 May 6 '11 at 16:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

When you use a += 1 in Python it refers to a local (uninitialized) variable in scope of g function. Basically you can read variables from upper scopes, but if you try to write it will refer to a variable in most recent scope. To make it work like you want you have to use nonlocal keyword that is only present Python 3. In Python 2 you can't do that as far as I know, unless the variable you're trying to change is is global, then global keyword comes to the rescue.

def f():
    a=0
    def g():
        nonlocal a
        a+=1
        print a
    return g
g=f()
g()
share|improve this answer
5  
In Python 2, a = [0] and a[0] += 1 makes it work. This works because item assignment (along with member and slice assignment) doesn't count as overwriting a variable, you instead change state of an object (under the hood, you call a method). –  delnan May 6 '11 at 13:41
    
Looks like an ugly hack but it is indeed a way out. –  Marek Sapota May 6 '11 at 13:59
    
This is related to the fact that integers are immutable: a += 1 is the same as a = a + 1 for ints. It binds the name a to a new expression instead of modifying the object currently named by a, like a list operation does. –  Daenyth May 6 '11 at 16:51
    
It is an ugly hack, That's why Python3 adds nonlocal afterall. Usually it is better to design the code to not need this kind of hack, but sometimes the complication of the alternative could be works than using the hacky way –  gnibbler May 7 '11 at 10:44

Version for python 2:

def f():
    a=0
    def g():
        g.a+=1
        print g.a

    g.a=a
    return g
g=f()
g()
share|improve this answer
3  
this is different from expected: calling g() twice return the same result –  user607722 May 6 '11 at 16:06
    
@user607722 fixed the problem code. Tested repeated calls. It might be better coded as a generator though to simplify keeping state. –  freegnu May 17 '11 at 5:19
    
Nice edit. I like it. –  freegnu Jan 27 '13 at 22:53

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