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I am a beginner of C++, I am studying virtual functions these days. There are some questions confuse me a lot.

for example:

class A {
  public:
  virtual void f() {
      //do something; 
  }
}

class B: public A {
   public:
   virtual void f() {
//do something;
}
}
  1. class A contains a virtual function f(), and class B inherits it. Inside class B, the function f() is also declared as virtual, so does this mean f() in class B overloads f() in class A? Does it allow classes which inherit B to overload f()? Or does B define a new virtual function which is different from f() in class A?

  2. Virtual functions provide a way of overloading methods. If B inherits A and does not declare the f() as virtual, then can a class C which inherits B overload the f() and achieve polymorphism?

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Look how much easier to read your question is now! –  Björn Pollex May 6 '11 at 11:20
    
@Space_C0wb0y yes, thank you, cowboy –  user707549 May 6 '11 at 11:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

inside class B, the function f() also be declared as virtual, so does this mean f() in class B overload f() in class A

No, it doesn't overload. It overrides. Also the keyword virtual is optional in class B. B::f() will always be a virtual function, whether you write virtual or not.

The term overload is used when you define a function with same name but different parameter(s). In your case, the signature of the function f is exactly same in both classes, that means it isn't overloading; the derived class basically overrides the base class definition of f().

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2  
How else can you override a function, without using virtual? –  Alok Save May 6 '11 at 11:34
    
@Als: See this : ideone.com/4MIRs ... that is overriding. As I said, virtual keyword only enables dynamic dispatching of the function (runtime polymorphism). –  Nawaz May 6 '11 at 11:43
2  
Virtual is required for overriding by definition, per §10.3p2 in C++03. –  Fred Nurk May 8 '11 at 16:21

Virtual keyword allows you to override functions not overload them.

Also, the virtual attribute is inherited so virtual keyword is optional for f() in class B.

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2  
@Nawaz:How else can you override functions without using virtual? –  Alok Save May 6 '11 at 11:32
2  
@nawaz: Since now you posted the correct link. This is still not overloading or overriding. It is function hiding. The derived struct version B::f() hides the base struct version A::f() –  Alok Save May 6 '11 at 11:45
3  
@Nawas: C++98 10.3/2 "If a virtual member function vf is declared in a class Base and in a class Derived, derived directly or indirectly from Base, a member function vf with the same name and smae parameter list as Base::vf is declared, then Derived::vf is also virtual an it overrides Base::vf." –  AProgrammer May 6 '11 at 12:27
2  
@Nawaz, could you point me to one place in the standard where override is use for something else? I found none, and I also note that C++0X is introducing a keyword override in order to check that a declaration is overriding a virtual member. –  AProgrammer May 6 '11 at 13:08
2  
@Nawaz: Als is right, using the terms as the C++ standard defines them. Colloquially, "overrides" and "overloads" may be used differently, but C++ has specific meanings for both. Overriding requires a virtual. –  Fred Nurk May 8 '11 at 15:53

When you declare a function virtual what you are really saying to the compiler is that you want this function to behave in a polymorphic manner. That is, from your example if we have the following:

A* foo = new B();
foo->f();

it will call B's "f" function and not A's "f" function. To take it further, if we have a C which inherits from B like you've said:

class C : public B{}

B* foo = new C();
foo->f():

this calls B's "f". If you had defined it within C, it would have called C's method.

To explain the different behavior between virtual and non-virtual let's take this example:

struct Foo{
    virtual void f();
    void g();
};

struct Bar{
    virtual void f();
    void g();
};

Foo* var = new Bar();
var->f(); //calls Bar's f
var->g(); //calls Foo's g, it's not virtual

make sense?

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Since A::f is virtual, and B::f has the same signature, it is said that B::f overrides A::f.

Which means:

A * p = new B;
p->f(); // invokes B::f

EDIT: The following is just plain wrong (see the comments):

Since B::f is also virtual, then it would be possible for a child class of B to override it again. If B:f wasn't virtual, than any method with the same signature in a child class would simply shadow it (that is, it would be a different method).

So, the behaviors depends on the parent.

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2  
Not entirely correct. You don't need to have virtual keyword in Class B to make it overridable in class C (derived from B). virtual in class B is optional and the only reason of it being there is to have some verbosity. –  Aamir May 6 '11 at 11:23
    
B::f() will always be virtual, the virtual keyword in B is optional. since f was declared virtual in A, all classes deriving form A or B can override f, even if virtual is not explicitly mentioned in B. –  sth May 6 '11 at 11:25
    
@sth: Even if f was not declared virtual, all classes derived from A can override it. –  Nawaz May 6 '11 at 11:30
    
@Everyone Damn, didn't know about that. Thanks. –  Etienne de Martel May 6 '11 at 12:39

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