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I have a list of words in a file. They might contain words like who's, didn't etc. So when reading from it I need to make them proper like "who is" and "did not". This has to be done in Java. I need to do this without losing much time.

This is actually for handling such queries during a search that uses solr.

Below is a sample code I tried using a hash map

Map<String, String> con = new HashMap<String, String>();
        con.put("'s", " is");
        con.put("'d", " would");
        con.put("'re", " are");
        con.put("'ll", " will");
        con.put("n't", " not");
        con.put("'nt", " not");

        String temp = null;
        String str = "where'd you're you'll would'nt hello";

        String[] words = str.split(" ");
        int index = -1 ;
        for(int i = 0;i<words.length && (index =words[i].lastIndexOf('\''))>-1;i++){
            temp = words[i].substring(index);
            if(con.containsKey(temp)){
                 temp = con.get(temp);
            }
            words[i] = words[i].substring(0, index)+temp;
            System.out.println(words[i]);           
        }
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I like ain't -> are not ;) –  Peter Lawrey May 6 '11 at 11:44
    
“He’s decided to go” shows that “’s” can be “he has”. Also, why bother? Do you have some idea that contractions are somehow improper? And what are you going to do about “’tisn’t” or “wouldn’t’ve”? –  tchrist May 6 '11 at 13:16
    
@tchrist is right, this is context-dependent. You could devise and algorithm that takes into account, but if you want to do that properly you may have to do full parsing. This is probably not worth the effort, since most of what you get out of this expansion is on the stop list anyway. –  larsmans May 6 '11 at 14:19
    
@larsmans Yes. That much effort on this is not worth it. My concern is that I dont want to search the index for words like "re" "ve" etc that are not meaningful –  Varshith May 6 '11 at 14:30
    
Or actually, full parsing may not be necessary, but some NLP sophistication would be required (and the result would still be overkill). –  larsmans May 6 '11 at 14:32
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you are worried about queries containing for eg "who's" finding documents containing for eg "who is" then you should look at using a Stemmer, which is designed exactly for this purpose.

You can easily add a stemmer buy configuring it as a filter in your solr config. See http://wiki.apache.org/solr/AnalyzersTokenizersTokenFilters

Edit:
A SnowballPorterFilterFactory will probably do the job for you.

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Currently using solr.PorterStemFilterFactory. Here the query for example "you're" becomes "you re" and so it searches for "you" and "re" in the index and finds no match. If "you're" is made as "you are" then it would have searched for "you" (as are is a common word) and would have returned results. This seems to be the issue now. –  Varshith May 6 '11 at 12:36
    
@user608167 I'd be suprised if the stemmer was splitting "you're" -> "you re". Are you sure your tokeniser isn't doing this before the stemmer comes into play? Can you post your <analyser> config? –  Qwerky May 6 '11 at 13:13
    
I am a beginner at solr. I was looking at it from the higher level. The tokeniser is making you're -> you re. And the output from the stemmer also is "you re". So the index is searched for you+re. How to handle this? –  Varshith May 6 '11 at 13:45
2  
@user608167 you have two options; 1) stem before tokenizing 2) don't tokenise on apostrophe. 2) makes more sense to me. –  Qwerky May 6 '11 at 13:51
    
from what I can see by debugging, the query for example you're goes through the up.parse(userQuery); present in DisMaxQParser.java. After that line it becomes you re. I am sure stemming is done here. The parse method above points to "lucene-core-2.9.3.jar". The query is not tokenized before that. –  Varshith May 6 '11 at 14:47
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The code can be written as

Map<String, String> con = new HashMap<String, String>();
    con.put("'s", " is");
    con.put("'d", " would");
    con.put("'re", " are");
    con.put("'ll", " will");
    con.put("n't", " not");
    con.put("'nt", " not");

    String str = "where'd you're you'll would'nt hello";

    for(String key : con.keySet()) {
        str = str.replaceAll(key + "\\b" , con.get(key));
    }

with the logic you have. But suppose its script's is a word which shows possession, changing it to script is alters the meaning.

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Following on from @James Jithin's last remark:

  • the "'s" -> " is" transform is incorrect if the word is a possessive form.
  • the "'d" -> " would" transform is incorrect in archaic forms, where the "'d" can be a contraction of "ed".
  • the "'nt" -> " not" transform is not correct because this is really just a mis-spelling of the "n't" contraction. (I mean "wo'nt" is just plain wrong ... isn't it.)

So, to my mind, the best way to implement this would be to enumerate the small number of contractions that are common and valid, and leave the rest alone. This also has the advantage that you can implement it with a simple string match rather than a suffix match.

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