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I have a recurring problem where I have a JList which I wish to update with new contents. I'm using a DefaultListModel which provides methods for adding new content to the list but when using these methods I find that some proportion of the calls result in a completely blank JList. Whether or not the update works seems to be random, and not related to the data which is sent.

Below is a simple program which demonstrates the problem. It simply generates a list of an increasing size to update a JList, but when run the list contents appear and disappear seemingly at random.

As far as I can tell I'm following the correct API to do this, but I guess there must be something fundamental I'm missing.

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import javax.swing.*;

public class ListUpdateTest extends JPanel {

    private JList list;
    private DefaultListModel model;

    public ListUpdateTest () {
        model = new DefaultListModel();
        list = new JList(model);

        setLayout(new BorderLayout());

        add(new JScrollPane(list),BorderLayout.CENTER);
        new UpdateRunner();
    }

    public void updateList (String [] entries) {
        model.removeAllElements();
        for (int i=0;i<entries.length;i++) {
            model.addElement(entries[i]);
        }
    }

    private class UpdateRunner implements Runnable {

        public UpdateRunner () {
            Thread t = new Thread(this);
            t.start();
        }

        public void run() {

            while (true) {
                int entryCount = model.size()+1;

                System.out.println("Should be "+entryCount+" entries");

                String [] entries = new String [entryCount];

                for (int i=0;i<entries.length;i++) {
                    entries[i] = "Entry "+i;
                }

                updateList(entries);

                try {
                    Thread.sleep(1000);
                } 
                catch (InterruptedException e) {}
            }
        }   
    }

    public static void main (String [] args) {

        JDialog dialog = new JDialog();
        dialog.setContentPane(new ListUpdateTest());
        dialog.setSize(200,400);
        dialog.setDefaultCloseOperation(JDialog.DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE);
        dialog.setModal(true);
        dialog.setVisible(true);
        System.exit(0);
    }

}

Any pointers would be very welcome.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Look at this code:

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import javax.swing.*;
import javax.swing.SwingWorker;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;
public class ListUpdateTest extends JPanel {

    private JList list;
    private DefaultListModel model;

    public ListUpdateTest () {
        model = new DefaultListModel();
        list = new JList(model);

        setLayout(new BorderLayout());

        add(new JScrollPane(list),BorderLayout.CENTER);
        (new UpdateRunner()).execute();
    }

    public void updateList (List<String> entries) {
        model.removeAllElements();
        for (String entry : entries) {
            model.addElement(entry);
        }
    }
    private class UpdateRunner extends SwingWorker<List<String>, List<String>>{

        @Override
        public List<String> doInBackground() {
            while (true) {
                int entryCount = model.size()+1;

                System.out.println("Should be "+entryCount+" entries");

                String [] entries = new String [entryCount];

                for (int i=0;i<entries.length;i++) {
                    entries[i] = "Entry "+i;
                }

                publish(Arrays.asList(entries));

                try {
                    Thread.sleep(1000);
                }
                catch (InterruptedException e) {}
            }
            return null;
        }
        @Override
        protected void process(List<List<String>> entries) {
            for (List<String> entry : entries) {
                updateList(entry);
            }
        }
        @Override
        protected void done() {
            updateList(Arrays.asList("done"));
        }
    }

    public static void main (String [] args) {

        JDialog dialog = new JDialog();
        dialog.setContentPane(new ListUpdateTest());
        dialog.setSize(200,400);
        dialog.setDefaultCloseOperation(JDialog.DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE);
        dialog.setModal(true);
        dialog.setVisible(true);
        System.exit(0);
    }

}

Implemented by SwingWorker. Works smooth.

share|improve this answer
    
but again with sleep(int); –  mKorbel May 6 '11 at 13:32
    
yeah, but that sleep doesn't touch EDT or main thread, it pauses Swing Worker thread. So no freezes or empty screens. –  dhblah May 6 '11 at 13:34
    
+1 I believe this is how to properly delegate such a workflow. –  mre May 6 '11 at 13:47
    
This seems to be exactly what I was looking for. I must confess I failed to see the problem with updating swing from different threads, but I shall read up on the way swing threads work. Thanks. –  Simon Andrews May 6 '11 at 14:38

Yea you should make sure it runs on EDT. I wonder did you not notice any exception BTW? I got one on first run.

Code to use instead (remove UpdateRunner and turn it into javax.swing.Timer):

        Timer t = new Timer(1000, new ActionListener() {    
            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
            {
                int entryCount = model.size()+1;    
                System.out.println("Should be "+entryCount+" entries");    
                String [] entries = new String [entryCount];    
                for (int i=0;i<entries.length;i++) {
                    entries[i] = "Entry "+i;
                }    
                updateList(entries);
            }
        });
        t.setRepeats(true);
        t.start();

This is why it is save to use it, as it is nicely explained in the class doc:

"The javax.swing.Timer has two features that can make it a little easier to use with GUIs. First, its event handling metaphor is familiar to GUI programmers and can make dealing with the event-dispatching thread a bit simpler. Second, its automatic thread sharing means that you don't have to take special steps to avoid spawning too many threads. Instead, your timer uses the same thread used to make cursors blink, tool tips appear, and so on."

share|improve this answer
    
    
Although my example just used a simple timer, in my real code I need a separate thread to do the update since it's collecting data in a more complex way. Is there an equivalent to Timer to create a separate thread which doesn't clash with the Swing update mechanism? –  Simon Andrews May 6 '11 at 13:19
    
the you have to look for SwingWorker as posted by @ gasan, but notice for Executor + SwingWorker for Java <1.6.022 bug bugs.sun.com/… –  mKorbel May 6 '11 at 13:36

that never call void updateList(...) but inside I missed sleep(int), for Swing is better and required using java.swing.Timer http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/uiswing/misc/timer.html

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes it does, but in a very convoluted way. But you're right, updating the list should be done on the EDT. –  mre May 6 '11 at 12:24
    
+1 for timer. Timer runs in the swing repaint thread and as a result, updates the UI correctly on every firing. –  spot35 May 6 '11 at 12:37
    
I agree with @sthupahsmaht Anyway +1 for the answer. –  Boro May 6 '11 at 12:37

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