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I have this code

$('div#create_result').text(XMLHttpRequest.responseText);

where the content of XMLHttpRequest is

responseText: Content-Type: application/json; charset=utf-8
{"error" : "User sdf doesn't exist"}
status: 200
statusText: parsererror

The result I see is

Content-Type: application/json; charset=utf-8 {"error" : "User sdf doesn't exist"}

where I would have liked

User sdf doesn't exist

How do I get just that?

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3  
If you are using jQuery anyway, why not use its built-in Ajax library and JSON shorthand method? –  Pekka 웃 May 6 '11 at 12:14
    
I have no idea how to get started on that. Can you give an example related to my code? –  Sandra Schlichting May 6 '11 at 12:23
1  
api.jquery.com/category/ajax –  SLaks May 6 '11 at 12:24
2  
Check out the examples on getJSON linked above. A very primitive example would be $.getJSON('your/url/here', function(data) { $('#create_result').text(data.error);}); –  Pekka 웃 May 6 '11 at 12:26
    
@Pekka put that in an answer so we can vote on it –  andynormancx May 6 '11 at 13:44
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2 Answers

up vote -1 down vote accepted

you can use a regular expresion to extract value; something like:

var pattern = new RegExp(": \"(.+)\"}");
var str = 'Content-Type: application/json; charset=utf-8 {"error" : "User sdf doesn\'t exist"}';
var match = pattern.exec(str);    
alert(match[1]);
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Don't use a regular expression for this. jQuery's built-in Ajax engine brings along everything that is needed to parse the JSON properly.

The most primitive example looks like this:

$.getJSON('your/url/here', function(data) 
  { $('#create_result').text(data.error);}
);

Documentation

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