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There is the following problem:

The most prestigious sports club in one city has exactly N members. Each of its members is strong and beautiful. More precisely, i-th member of this club (members being numbered by the time they entered the club) has strength Si and beauty Bi. Since this is a very prestigious club, its members are very rich and therefore extraordinary people, so they often extremely hate each other. Strictly speaking, i-th member of the club Mr X hates j-th member of the club Mr Y if Si ≤ Sj and Bi ≥ Bj or if Si ≥ Sj and Bi ≤ Bj (if both properties of Mr X are greater then corresponding properties of Mr Y, he doesn't even notice him, on the other hand, if both of his properties are less, he respects Mr Y very much).

To celebrate a new 2003 year, the administration of the club is planning to organize a party. However they are afraid that if two people who hate each other would simultaneouly attend the party, after a drink or two they would start a fight. So no two people who hate each other should be invited. On the other hand, to keep the club prestige at the apropriate level, administration wants to invite as many people as possible.

Being the only one among administration who is not afraid of touching a computer, you are to write a program which would find out whom to invite to the party.

Input

*The first line of the input file contains integer N — the number of members of the club. ( 2 ≤ N ≤ 100,000 ). Next N lines contain two numbers each — Si and Bi respectively ( 1 ≤ Si, Bi ≤ 109 ).*

Output

On the first line of the output file print the maximum number of the people that can be invited to the party. On the second line output N integers — numbers of members to be invited in arbitrary order. If several solutions exist, output any one.

Sample test(s)

Input

  4
  1 1
  1 2
  2 1
  2 2

Output

  2
  1 4

I am trying to solve a problem but the complexity of my algorithm is O(N^2) and since 2<=N<=100000 there is a need to improve an algorithm. I was solving the problem using longest increasing subsequence dynamic programming algorithm which has O(N^2) complexity. Does anybody have an idea how to improve the algorithm?

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1  
I guess this is homework, if not, remove the tag again. –  Björn Pollex May 6 '11 at 13:43
    
TL;DR. Ok...that's not true, I did. But you should translate this to a mathematical/programming question. Beside of that: are you looking for a maximal chain in the relation(X admires Y)? ......(Dilworth) –  tgmath May 6 '11 at 13:47
2  
@Space_C0wb0y: it is not a homework, it is a problem from acm contest. if you are able to solve it within 1 hour treat yourself as a good coder ;) –  Tim May 6 '11 at 13:50
    
@tgmath: exactly, there is a need to find maximal chain in the relation(X admires Y), the thing is that N<=10^5 and ordinary algorithm has O(N^2) complexity which is not feasible to achieve in 2 seconds. –  Tim May 6 '11 at 13:54
1  
The respect relation defines a partial order. You are trying to find the longest possible chain a < b <c with respect to this partial order. –  hugomg May 6 '11 at 17:36

5 Answers 5

Here are some arguments how btilly's solution works:

  • in fact, the respect and ignore are symmetric in the sense that if A respects B then B ignores A, so it's enough to look only at one of the relations, e.g. respect'.

  • As pointed out by missingno, the respect relation is transitive meaning that if A respects B and B respects C then also A respects C (and all those which B respects).

  • consider the following graph: the vertices represent the members and a directed edge from A to B means that A respects B (or equivalently, B ignores A). After one has eliminated duplicates (which can be considered members a weight corresponding to their multiplicity), we realize that there can be no cycles (if A respects B it's not possible that B respects A through other members, at some point one would have to have an edge which goes in the wrong direction), i.e. we have a directed acyclic graph.

  • consider a path through the graph: if member A is on that path, all other vertices on the path are either respected by A (further 'downstream') or ignored by A (further 'upstream'). Thus any path through the graph represents a group of members which all like each other.

  • On the other hand, if there is no path between A and B, they hate each other (otherwise there would be e.g. a direct edge between them).

  • so we have reformulated the problem to finding the longest path through a directed acyclic graph (where each edge has weight one) which can be done in linear time once we have constructed such a graph.

The problem which remains is to construct the graph faster than O(N^2) i.e. without having to go through all possible pairs of vertices.

Here is btilly's example in graphical form (where the arrows mean respect):

example graph

  • when arriving at vertex A, we only need to add the 'closest' neighbours in some sense, i.e. not those like D which we can reach through others like B and C.

  • this is where the sorting ascending in one coordinate and descending in the other coordinate comes from: after we have added the edge from A to B we would not add a direct edge from A to D (because going from A to D through either B or C is better), so we only need to look at vertices which are right of and below B (those which can't have an edge with B)

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Here is a O(n log(n)) answer in a reasonable amount of detail.

First sort the people by beauty ascending, strength descending. Eliminate duplicates. (Either explicitly here, or implicitly by skipping over them in the next step.)

Run through the list. As you go, maintain a balanced tree of people who are possibly on their way to being the next person in a maximal ascending chain. Each person should be stored with a length of the current chain, and a pointer to a linked list of the rest of the people in the chain. The tree should be sorted by strength.

More specifically whenever you see a new person, find the next weakest person in the tree (nobody is OK), and construct a triplet (person, length of chain, pointer to chain). Insert the person in the tree. If the next stronger person in the tree has a chain no longer than the current person, delete that person. All of these operations are O(log(n)).

When you have finished processing all of the people, the maximal record in the tree will have a person at the end of a maximal chain of people, the length of the chain, and a pointer to a linked list with the rest of the people in the chain. That is your answer, print it out.

To show you with your sample data, here is what you start with:

4
1 1
1 2
2 1
2 2

This represents:

{person: 1, beauty: 1, strength: 1}
{person: 2, beauty: 2, strength: 1}
{person: 3, beauty: 1, strength: 2}
{person: 4, beauty: 2, strength: 2}

Sort by beauty increasing, then strength decreasing (there are no duplicates) to get:

{person: 3, beauty: 1, strength: 2}
{person: 1, beauty: 1, strength: 1}
{person: 4, beauty: 2, strength: 2}
{person: 2, beauty: 2, strength: 1}

To simplify things I'll just represent the tree by a sorted set. This is not how it should be represented in memory.

After inserting person 3:

{person: 3, strength: 2, length: 1, next_person: null}

Next person 1 bumps person 3.

{person: 1, strength: 1, length: 1, next_person: null}

Then person 4 comes after person 1. (I've written the linked list as a nested data structure, in reality it should be a linked list.)

{person: 1, strength: 1, length: 1, next_person: null}
{person: 4, strength: 2, length: 2, next_person: {person: 1, next_person: null}}

Then person 2 bumps person 1.

{person: 2, strength: 1, length: 1, next_person: null}
{person: 4, strength: 2, length: 2, next_person: {person: 1, next_person: null}}

To find your answer look at the end of the tree, at person 4, points at person 1. And your answer is length 2, and then (from the best to the worst) persons 4 then 1.

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Change your example input so that the strength and beauty of people aren't the same. (For instance, person 1 should actually hate person 3) –  hugomg May 6 '11 at 17:34
    
Also, it might help clarity if you change the example to be less verbose (represent people as just tuples and don't recurse the linked list all the way - it should always point to people visible on the tree, if I'm not mistaken) –  hugomg May 6 '11 at 17:37
    
@missingno: You are mistaken, the previous people may have been knocked out of the tree by someone with lower strength and higher beauty. This happens in the example after person 2 bumps person 1. As for the example, I used the example in the problem statement. Also you are correct that person 1 should hate person 3. Hrm, I got the example slightly wrong. I'll fix shortly –  btilly May 6 '11 at 18:18

I don't think your O(n^2) solution is even correct, let alone efficient. If you have something like this:

3
2 2
1 1
3 3

The answer is 3. The classical LIS algorithm would give 2 however. Did you account for this?

What you can do is sort by Si and apply LIS in O(n log n) time on Bi. For that you can either use segment trees or a simpler algorithm involving a binary search. Let me know if you need more help with this.

The total complexity is O(n log n): sorting can be done in this time, and so can LIS.

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Did you account for this? Definately, at the time of determining number of longest subsequence for j I go through all elements of an array, i.e i <- 0 to a.length-1, classical LIS goes until j, i.e. i <- 0 until j-1 –  Tim May 6 '11 at 17:02
    
@Tim - I think that won't work either. You don't have the values for i >= j computed yet, so what good is going from - to a.length - 1? Do you get the correct answer on my sample data? In any case, sorting eliminates this problem and gives you a more efficient solution. –  IVlad May 6 '11 at 17:08
    
The solution works. The answer is correct on your data. Those ith problems which are not solved at the moment of invocation are solved when necessary. The thing to notice: if a[i]<a[j] we solve ith problem, therefore, we go through all those ith which are strictly less then j. Unfortunately, it is not possible to sort an array since there is no natural ordering of the elements, you may consider (1 1) (2 2) (1 2). Thus, we are obliged to go through all elements of an array. –  Tim May 6 '11 at 18:00

If you think of a graph with club members as vertices and 'like' as edges (i.e. if two members do not hate each other there is an edge between the corresponding vertices), one can reformulate the problem as follows:

find the maximum subset of vertices for which there is an edge between all vertices in the subset.

In fact, a subset where all vertices have mutual edges is called a Clique or complete subgraph.

To find the maximum clique takes exponential time if one can not exploit further features of the graph (see this link). This article suggests the Bron–Kerbosch algorithm.

Drawing the members in the (S,B) plane, one can see that a 'like' edge corresponds to lines going out of a vertex in the direction between 12 and 3 o'clock and between 6 and 9 o'clock. It is easy to construct an example where such edges intersect, so it's unfortunately not a planar graph.

And unfortunately, the 'like' relationship is not transitive, i.e. if A likes B and B likes C this does not imply that A also likes C (again, this is easy to see in the (S,B) plane).

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And unfortunately, the 'like' relationship is not transitive if it was transitive relationship it would be possible to solve the problem in O(N*LogN) time (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…) –  Tim May 6 '11 at 14:26
    
Like is not transitive, but respect is. –  hugomg May 6 '11 at 17:35

Two people with identical strength and beauty hate one another, and the bounds on strength and beauty are pretty tight…

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Drive-by downvote. Nice. O(N^2) is fine if you can make N small enough. –  adlskf May 6 '11 at 14:24
    
1 ≤ Si, Bi ≤ 109 –  adlskf May 6 '11 at 14:36
    
I see, that's actually 10 ** 9 in the original. Since presumably only Tim knew that I guess I won't bother posting the n log n solution. –  adlskf May 6 '11 at 14:40
    
Constructive answers please ! :( –  NirmalGeo May 6 '11 at 15:20

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