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How can I run each call for loop in another thread, but continuation of ExternalMethod should wait to ending of last working thread from for loop (and synchronize) ?

ExternalMethod()
{
    //some calculations
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        SomeMethod(i);
    }
    //continuation ExternalMethod
}
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How about using Parallel For? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd460703.aspx –  Joel Lee May 6 '11 at 14:49
    
Good but not in .NET 3.5 :) –  Saint May 9 '11 at 7:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

One approach would be to use a ManualResetEvent.

Consider the following code (note that this should not be taken as a working example, stuck on OSX so don't have VS nor a C# compiler to hand to check this over):

static ManualResetEvent mre = new ManualResetEvent(false);
static int DoneCount = 0;
static int DoneRequired = 9;
void ExternalMethod() {
        mre.Reset();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
                new Thread(new ThreadStart(ThreadVoid)).Start();
        }
        mre.WaitOne();
}

void ThreadVoid() {
        Interlocked.Increment(ref DoneCount);   

        if (DoneCount == DoneRequired) {
                mre.Set();
        }
}

IMPORTANT - This possibly isn't the best way to do it, just an example of using ManualResetEvent, and it will suit your needs perfectly fine.

If you're on .NET 4.0 you can use a Parallel.For loop - explained here.

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as a side note you could always grab Mono:OSX –  Conrad Frix May 6 '11 at 14:57
    
Shouldn't you use Interlocked.Increment instead of ++? I though ++ was unsafe. –  recursive May 6 '11 at 14:58
    
This is very true, but it's a work machine and have no justifiable reason for doing so.... Yet ;-) –  Rudi Visser May 6 '11 at 14:58
    
@recursive Depending on the operation that's taking place it won't matter. However it's always best practice to use the safer operation. Answer updated! –  Rudi Visser May 6 '11 at 15:00
    
re ++ vs Interlocked.Increment, since there is contention on the shared DoneCount, ++ is always wrong. It depends on nothing, ++ is always a bug in this context. –  David Heffernan May 6 '11 at 16:36
System.Threading.Tasks.Parallel.For(0, 10, (i) => SomeMethod(i));
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Good, but I need for .NET 3.5 :) –  Saint May 6 '11 at 14:53

One approach is to use a CountdownEvent.

ExternalMethod()
{
    //some calculations
    var finished = new CountdownEvent(1);
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        int capture = i; // This is needed to capture the loop variable correctly.
        finished.AddCount();
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(
          (state) =>
          {
            try
            {
              SomeMethod(capture);
            }
            finally
            {
              finished.Signal();
            }
          }, null);
    }
    finished.Signal();
    finished.Wait();
    //continuation ExternalMethod
}

If CountdownEvent is not available then here is an alternate approach.

ExternalMethod()
{
    //some calculations
    var finished = new ManualResetEvent(false);
    int pending = 1;
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        int capture = i; // This is needed to capture the loop variable correctly.
        Interlocked.Increment(ref pending);
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(
          (state) =>
          {
            try
            {
              SomeMethod(capture);
            }
            finally
            {
              if (Interlocked.Decrement(ref pending) == 0) finished.Set();
            }
          }, null);
    }
    if (Interlocked.Decrement(ref pending) == 0) finished.Set();
    finished.WaitOne();
    //continuation ExternalMethod
}

Note that in both examples the for loop itself is treating as a parallel work item (it is on a separate thread from the other work items afterall) to avoid a really subtle race condition that might occur if the first work item signals the event before the next work item is queued.

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First is for .NET 4.0. Second doesn't compile because "Delegate 'System.Threading.WaitCallback' does not take '0' arguments" in ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem. –  Saint May 9 '11 at 7:34
    
Fixed. I also noticed another problem with the capturing of the loop variable in the lambda expression. –  Brian Gideon May 9 '11 at 12:34

For .NET 3.5, maybe something like this:

Thread[] threads = new Thread[10];

for (int x = 0; x < 10; x++)
{
    threads[x] = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(ThreadFun));
    threads[x].Start(x);
}

foreach (Thread thread in threads) thread.Join();

It may seem counterintuitive to use the Join() method, but since you are effectively doing a WaitAll-type pattern, it doesn't matter what order the joins are executed.

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I want to run each iteration paralell in the same time. Only current thread shoul wait to ending last thread from for loop. If I understand correctly your example - every Thread is waiting for earlier Thread - wasting time in my situation –  Saint May 9 '11 at 7:58
    
The thread.Join() call causes the calling (parent) thread to block and wait for the called (child) thread to complete. None of the child threads are dependent on any other thread. It does not matter what order you wait on the threads since a call to Join() on completed threads will return immediately and a call on running threads will block until they are done. The advantage here is that your child threads do not have to be cooperative in order for this technique to work. In other words, this technique can be use with ANY thread (unmodified) you want to run in parallel. –  seairth May 9 '11 at 12:57

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