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Given an extremely simple object with only fields, e.g.:

class Contact {

   string firstName;
   string lastName;
   DateTime birthday;
   ...
}

When you add a strongly-typed View with view content "Create", you get a nice form with all the fields of your object that passes the form back to the controller, etc, and life is good.

However, when the object becomes slightly more complex, like say we want to store email addresses for Contacts (and of course a Contact can certainly have more than one email address):

class Contact {

   string firstName;
   string lastName;
   DateTime birthday;
   ICollection<EmailAddress> emailAddresses;
   ...
}

Now when you add the strongly-typed view with view Content "Create", you get the same form as before, and the collection is not represented in the form in any way.

So now you have a form which is complete with one exception: you would like to add a section where the user can enter in as many or as few email addresses as they like and have those wrapped up and passed to the Controller on submit.

Is there a standard best-practice way of doing this in ASP.NET MVC2? If so, what is it?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

MVC3 handles this a lot better but as your using MVC2 take a look at Steve Sanderson's detailed post on Editing a variable length list, ASP.NET MVC 2-style.

Phil Haack's Model binding to a list also gives you further information on how the default MVC2 model binders handle lists

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To go along with the other answer about Knockout (which was written by Steve Sanderson), here's his post on how to do the same thing using Knockout. blog.stevensanderson.com/2010/07/12/… –  Ryan May 6 '11 at 22:29
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Well, conceivably you can have your entire view be

HTML.EditorForModel()

If you follow the answer I posted to How to display the content of asp.net cache? to allow the Editor to do a deep dive against your model.

That's not the optimal solution. Manipulating List data in MVC is HARD. Mostly because of years of ASP.NET development has left us so disjoint from the metal of the web that the concepts of editing a list client side is easily lost on us.

For working with lists, you will also most likely need to work with client templating to be able to add new elements and remove elements easily. This can be get very complex due to the fact MVC requires all lists to be indexed and follow numerically otherwise on post backs you will be missing items (aside: I feel this was a terrible design decision)

Now with this being said, I would recommend looking at the KnockoutJS and KnockoutMapping frameworks which with the combination of jQuery and jQuery templating will allow you to create a very rich client experience. This unfortunately will most likely be a very radical departure from your existing development style however I feel what Knockout brings to the table is revolutionary and will open up the web so much further to ASP.NET MVC developers.

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I don't know if I would classify it as "HARD". It's not as easy as a simpler model, certainly... but that's why we get paid the big bucks over the amateurs, right? ;) –  Andrew Barber May 6 '11 at 15:09
    
@Andrew Barber what would you classify as hard then? I really can't think of any specific universal problem like this one that is any where even registering on my charts of hard to do GREAT. As with everything not caring about excellence drops the bar very fast. –  Chris Marisic May 6 '11 at 15:57
1  
KnockoutJS absolutely changed the way I make web applications and users love it. –  Ryan May 6 '11 at 22:27
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