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so how do you prefer to declare and use global variables? 1)

global variable;
echo $variable;

or 2)

echo $GLOBALS['variable'];

?

Which is the less bad method? :)

edit:

or 3)

class myglobalstuff{

  static $instance;

  public static function foo(){
    if(!(self::$instance instanceof self))
      self::$instance = new self();

    return self::$instance;
  }
}
...

?

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For inside class methods, accessing properties of the class? If that's the case, I'd say $this->variable would be much better. –  minitech May 6 '11 at 16:22

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

We prefer to not use global variables at all. And same goes for Singletons and Registries and every other way of having a global state.

You would be much better off if you learned how to write a proper OOP code.


update

Few links and related information:

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3  
but there are cases in which you need them... –  Alex May 6 '11 at 16:24
1  
@Alex : no there are only cases, when you application design is flawed. The Clean Code Talks - "Global State and Singletons" –  tereško May 6 '11 at 16:26
    
I would really be interested if you could expand on the proper methods or link to some reading material about the proper methods. –  Brad F Jacobs May 6 '11 at 16:26
    
@Brad what sort of materials are you actually after ? If you want to know what you should avoid global state, then in code, then web is full of links. If you want the books , then scroll down to the bottom of this answer , there you will find the books i would recommend ( there is not enough space to put them in comment ) –  tereško May 6 '11 at 16:31
    
@teresko: that video is about java. I don't know java :( maybe it's better than php? Anyway, the only way to avoid globals in PHP is to pass parameters like crazy between functions. Doesn't this create even more confusion than using a global variable? –  Alex May 6 '11 at 16:38

Using $GLOBALS is less bad. But if you can, avoid globals :)

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The PHP manual explains how to define and use global variables: $GLOBAL

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The global keyword doesn't create a global variable as such, it simply tells the script to treat the variable with global scope.

The $GLOBALS array is actually a superglobal variable, which is slightly different.

More info here, it's a good read: http://php.net/manual/en/language.variables.scope.php

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Like Nick said, it is pointless to do the following in globally scoped code (code not inside a function or method declaration): global $foo; $foo = "someValueForEverything"; $foo is global because it is declared globally (not because of the "global" keyword). One would use "global" inside a function or method that needs to reference the global $foo (else a local $foo would come into existence). –  grantwparks Aug 7 '11 at 19:42

Putting aside for a minute how evil global variables may be, let me break this down to a more generic problem that I've spotted: using string array keys instead of variables.

Typing string array keys may lead to typos which may be tricky to spot: $GLOBALS['var1'] vs $GLOBALS['varl'] (one vs lamda).

If you have a modern IDE that does autocompletion you will find it useful to declare global $variable and then, when typing it in, to invoke autocompletion to get an indication you didn't make a typo.

Such a modern IDE may also have occurences highlighting which will help with avoiding typos (you can see if it appears nearby) as well as navigating your code. It, again, will only work with variables and not array keys.

If you need to use globals then using $GLOBALS may be better in reminding you where the variable came from when you're hunting down some value. It might, however, pay off to atleast define the variable names as a constant to take advantage of IDE autocomplete and occurence highlighting: $GLOBALS[_VAR1].

Ofcourse these nifty features also work with class variables which is yet another reason to consider refactoring :)

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I'd go with $_SESSION['var'] over $GLOBALS. It does more or less the same, but safer. Edit: I meant to say more preferred method. But $GLOBALS was said to be depreciated soon anyway.

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Why is $_SESSION safer? –  Felix Kling May 6 '11 at 16:25
    
It's not and stuffing things into the session just to make them global is a bad idea because it may have adverse affects on the application (since it persists the data). If you REALLY need globals, then I would stick it behind a singleton, but my suggestion would be to pass the data as parameters. –  John Cartwright May 6 '11 at 16:27
    
@John, you can clear the session after your done with it by running session_destroy() and unset(), so it's not that bad if you use it properly to bring it back and forth from page to page as global. –  robx May 6 '11 at 16:30
    
Agree with John, this is kind of a technically ridiculous suggestion, no offense intended personally. –  grantwparks Aug 7 '11 at 19:35
    
To each their own I guess. No offense taken ;) –  robx Aug 7 '11 at 22:12

Also, ignoring the "no globals" argument, I'd like to make a fine distinction about the use of the "global" declaration, because I've seen it misused all over. At least in PHP 5, it is pointless to do the following in globally scoped code (code not inside a function or method declaration):

global $foo;
$foo = "someValueForEverything";

$foo is global because it is declared globally (not because of the "global" keyword). One would use "global" inside a function or method that needs to reference the global $foo (else a local $foo would come into existence).

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