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EDIT: Changed to a boolean flag, but still prints more than it should:

string line; // a string to hold the current line
while(getline(myFile,line)) {
bool old_count = false; // to help determine whether the line has been output yet
for (unsigned int i = 0; i < line.length(); i++) {
    string test = line.substr( i, targ_length );
    if ( strcmp(word.c_str(),test.c_str()) == 0  ) {
        count++;
        if ( !old_count ); {
        cout << line_num << " : " << line << endl;
        } // end if
        old_count=true;
    } // end if     
} //end for
line_num++;
} // end while

/end edit

I have an assignment to write a program to search for a word in a text file. I've got it to work perfectly except, it is supposed to print each line that the word is found in, and my program will print the same line multiple times if the word appears multiple times in the line. I need it to only print a line once. I've tried moving the if (count != old_count) around different places but not luck and got confused. My code is below. Thanks for any help!

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <cstring>
using namespace std;

/* minimum required number of parameters */
#define MIN_REQUIRED 3

/* display usage */
int help() {
printf("Proper usage: findWord <word> <file>\n");
printf("where\n");
printf("    <word> is a sequence of non-whitespace characters\n");
printf("    <file> is the file in which to search for the word\n");
printf("example: findWord the test.txt\n");
return 1;
}

/*
 * Program that searches for occurrences of given word within a given file
 * @return 0 (default for a main method)
 */
int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {

if (argc < MIN_REQUIRED) {
return help();
} // end if

string word = argv[1]; // the word to be searched for
string file_name = argv[2]; // the name of the file to be read

ifstream myFile(file_name.c_str()); // read the file
if (! myFile) {
cerr << "File '" << file_name << "' could not be opened" << endl;
return -1;
} // end if

cout << "Searching for '" << word << "' in file '" << file_name << "'\n";

int targ_length = word.length(); // the legnth of the string we're searching for

int count = 0; // running count of instances of word found
int line_num = 1; // number of current line

string line; // a string to hold the current line
while(getline(myFile,line)) {
int old_count = count; // to help determine whether the line has been output yet
for (unsigned int i = 0; i < line.length(); i++) {
    string test = line.substr( i, targ_length );
    if ( strcmp(word.c_str(),test.c_str()) == 0  ) {
        count++;
    } // end if
    if ( old_count != count ); {
        cout << line_num << " : " << line << endl;
    } // end if     
} //end for
line_num++;
} // end while

cout << "# occurrences of '" << word <<" ' = " << count << endl;

return 0;
}
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try changing the int flag for a bool flag, like the following:

while(getline(myFile,line)) {
bool old_count = false; // to help determine whether the line has been output yet
bool second_flag = false;
for (unsigned int i = 0; i < line.length(); i++) {
    string test = line.substr( i, targ_length );
    if ( strcmp(word.c_str(),test.c_str()) == 0  ) {
        old_count = true;
    } // end if
    if ( old_count && !second_flag ){
        cout << line_num << " : " << line << endl;
        second_flag = true;
    } // end if     
} //end for
line_num++;
} // end while
share|improve this answer
    
The bool flag was a good idea! I changed the nesting to what I thought would work, but it still prints a line multiple times if the word is found more than once in it. old_count should not be set to false again until it reads the next line, right? What am I missing? (See edit) –  Liz Z May 6 '11 at 18:32
    
The way I gave you the code, the flag is set to false just once for every line, it should work. EDIT: Check my edited snippet, not sure if there was a ; that was preventing the flag to be set up correctly –  camiloqp May 6 '11 at 18:40
    
I did try it the way you gave it, the program prints the current line for every substring it tests. Which it shouldn't. ? –  Liz Z May 6 '11 at 18:50
    
You are right, it will print the current line whether the substring is on the line or not, then a need for a 2nd flag is needed, check my edited code. Note: This might not be the most efficient way to do it, I am simply adapting your code. –  camiloqp May 6 '11 at 19:08
    
Thanks that did work (I also found a misplaced ; that got in the way of the second if statement- much less confusing once I got rid of that!) And yeah, don't know if it's most efficient but I feel good (for the sake of honesty) that at least I came up with the flag idea myself and didn't get help on everything. ;) –  Liz Z May 6 '11 at 19:42

Use an associative container, like std::set, that will only hold the line value once even if you attempt to insert it repeatedly.

In addition, your code is full of some highly pointless C-isms.

if ( strcmp(word.c_str(),test.c_str()) == 0  ) {

should be

if (word == test )) {

#define should be a static const int, printf replaced with cout.

share|improve this answer
    
We were told to use strcmp, but thanks for the tips on the other pointless C-isms... fixed those... I'm still n00bish. –  Liz Z May 6 '11 at 19:44

If you need to print the line once if the word is present, regardless of how many additional times the word is found in the line, then there's no reason to keep searching after you have found the first occurrence. When you first find the word in a line, simply print out the line number and line immediately, then break out of the inner for loop. If you do this, there's no need to bother with count variables.

The code would be something like this:

while(getline(myFile,line)) {
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < line.length(); i++) {
        string test = line.substr( i, targ_length );
        if ( strcmp(word.c_str(),test.c_str()) == 0  ) {
            cout << line_num << " : " << line << endl;
            break; // exit inner for loop as soon as the word is found
        } // end if     
    } //end for
    line_num++;
} // end while
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That would work except I need the count variable to print how many instances found once it's done with the file. Got it now. –  Liz Z May 6 '11 at 19:48

You are using the wrong tool for the job. Instead of calling substr() for each character in the current line, use a function that finds the desired string within the line. Seems like strstr() might be what you need. http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstring/strstr/

share|improve this answer
    
strstr() works on C-strings, and the OP is clearly not using said. You could recommend find(). –  Puppy May 6 '11 at 18:36
    
yes thanks but we were told in the assignment to use strcmp(). And that works; the issue is how many times it outputs the current line. –  Liz Z May 6 '11 at 18:52
    
I have provided another answer based on the information that use of strcmp() is required. –  Alanyst May 6 '11 at 19:15

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