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I editted the code so that the 3 buttons now show up .Can someone please tell me how to make it so that when I click the button that says Helloworld and application called Helloworld.py will pop-up in another window.Same for the other 2 buttons

!/usr/bin/env python

#  menu.py

import pygtk
pygtk.require('2.0')
import gtk

class MenuExample:
    def __init__(self):
        # create a new window
        window = gtk.Window(gtk.WINDOW_TOPLEVEL)
        window.set_size_request(200, 100)
        window.set_title("GTK Menu Test")
        window.connect("delete_event", lambda w,e: gtk.main_quit())

        # Init the menu-widget, and remember -- never
        # show() the menu widget!! 
        # This is the menu that holds the menu items, the one that
        # will pop up when you click on the "Root Menu" in the app
        menu = gtk.Menu()

        # Next we make a little loop that makes three menu-entries for
        # "test-menu".  Notice the call to gtk_menu_append.  Here we are
        # adding a list of menu items to our menu.  Normally, we'd also
        # catch the "clicked" signal on each of the menu items and setup a
        # callback for it, but it's omitted here to save space.
        for i in range(3):
            # Copy the names to the buf.
            buf = "Test-undermenu - %d" % i

            # Create a new menu-item with a name...
            menu_items = gtk.MenuItem(buf)

            # ...and add it to the menu.
            menu.append(menu_items)

        # Do something interesting when the menuitem is selected
        menu_items.connect("activate", self.menuitem_response, buf)

            # Show the widget
            menu_items.show()

        # This is the root menu, and will be the label
        # displayed on the menu bar.  There won't be a signal handler attached,
        # as it only pops up the rest of the menu when pressed.
        root_menu = gtk.MenuItem("Root Menu")

        root_menu.show()

        # Now we specify that we want our newly created "menu" to be the
        # menu for the "root menu"
        root_menu.set_submenu(menu)

        # A vbox to put a menu and a button in:
        vbox = gtk.VBox(False, 0)
        window.add(vbox)
        vbox.show()

        # Create a menu-bar to hold the menus and add it to our main window
        menu_bar = gtk.MenuBar()
        vbox.pack_start(menu_bar, False, False, 2)
        menu_bar.show()

        # Create a button to which to attach menu as a popup
        button = gtk.Button("HelloWorld")
        button.connect_object("event", self.button_press, menu)
        vbox.pack_end(button, True, True, 2)
        button.show()

        button2 = gtk.Button("Scrible")
        button2.connect_object("event", self.button_press, menu)
        vbox.pack_end(button2, True, True, 2)
        button2.show()

        button3 = gtk.Button("Final")
        button3.connect_object("event", self.button_press, menu)
        vbox.pack_end(button3, True, True, 2)
        button3.show()

        # And finally we append the menu-item to the menu-bar -- this is the
        # "root" menu-item I have been raving about =)
        menu_bar.append (root_menu)

        # always display the window as the last step so it all splashes on
        # the screen at once.
        window.show()

    # Respond to a button-press by posting a menu passed in as widget.
    #
    # Note that the "widget" argument is the menu being posted, NOT
    # the button that was pressed.
    def button_press(self, widget, event):
        if event.type == gtk.gdk.BUTTON_PRESS:
            widget.popup(None, None, None, event.button, event.time)
            # Tell calling code that we have handled this event the buck
            # stops here.
            return True
        # Tell calling code that we have not handled this event pass it on.
        return False

    def button2_press(self, widget, event):
        if event.type == gtk.gdk.BUTTON2_PRESS:
            widget.popup(None, None, None, event.button, event.time)
            return True
        return False

    def button3_press(self, widget, event):
        if event.type == gtk.gdk.BUTTON3_PRESS:
            widget.popup(None, None, None, event.button, event.time)
            return True
        return False

    # Print a string when a menu item is selected
    def menuitem_response(self, widget, string):
        print "%s" % string

def main():
    gtk.main()
    return 0

if __name__ == "__main__":
    MenuExample()
    main()
share|improve this question
    
Cam some one please try to help this is really bothering me i can't sleep –  Liam Yorkville May 7 '11 at 0:46
    
welcome to Stack Overflow. Can you perhaps provide a minimal example of code, or tell us more clearly what you are trying to achieve and what you have tried already? It sounds like your problem might have a simple solution, but people will be more likely to figure it out if they don't have to wade through a large screen full of code with not much explanation. Good luck! –  ptomato May 7 '11 at 6:47
    
Please check if my answer helped you. –  ralphtheninja May 8 '11 at 10:16

1 Answer 1

You could do something like this. I'm assuming you just want to execute your .py files, e.g. helloworld.py etc. I'm using Popen from subprocess to execute python (not assuming the py files are executable) scripts. Note that I've edited the script to only have one button, this is just to show you the idea.

import pygtk
pygtk.require('2.0')
import gtk

import subprocess

class Example:
    def __init__(self):
        window = gtk.Window(gtk.WINDOW_TOPLEVEL)
        window.set_size_request(200, 100)
        window.set_title("GTK Menu Test")
        window.connect("delete_event", 
                       lambda w,e: gtk.main_quit())

        vbox = gtk.VBox(False, 0)
        window.add(vbox)
        vbox.show()

        button = gtk.Button("HelloWorld")
        button.connect("clicked", self.clicked_helloworld)
        vbox.pack_end(button, True, True, 2)
        button.show()

        window.show_all()

    def clicked_helloworld(self, widget):
        subprocess.Popen(["python", "helloworld.py"])

    def main(self):
        gtk.main()
        return 0

Example().main()
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Liam got finally aslept and did not waked up to upvote you. I do for him ;-) –  joaquin Nov 26 '11 at 8:29

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