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I've been reading up a bit on anti-aliasing and it seems to make sense, but there is one thing I'm not too sure of. How exactly do you find the maximum frequency of a signal (in the context of graphics).

I realize there's more than one case so I assume there is more than one answer. But first let me state a simple algorithm that I think would represent maximum frequency so someone can tell me if I'm conceptualizing it the wrong way.

Let's say it's for a 1 dimensional,finite, and greyscale image (in pixels). Am I correct in assuming you could simply scan the entire pixel line (in the spatial domain) looking for a for the minimum oscillation and the inverse of that smallest oscillation would be the maximum frequency?

Ex values {23,26,28,22,48,49,51,49}

Frequency:Pertaining to Set {}

(1/2) = .5 : {28,22}

(1/4) = .25 : {22,48,49,51}

So would .5 be the maximum frequency?

And what would be the ideal way to calculate this for a similar pixel line as the one above?

And on a more theoretical note, what if your sampling input was infinite (more like the real world)? Would a valid process be sort of like:

Predetermine a decent interval for point sampling
Determine max frequency from point sampling
while(2*maxFrequency >  pointSamplingInterval)
{
pointSamplingInterval*=2
Redetermine maxFrequency from point sampling (with new interval)
}

I know these algorithms are fraught with inefficiencies, so what are some of the preferred ways? (Not looking for something crazy-optimized, just fundamentally better concepts)

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

The proper way to approach this is using a Fourier Transform (in practice, an FFT,or fast fourier transform)

The theory works as follows: if you have an set of pixels with color/grayscale, then we can say that the image is represented by pixels in the "spatial domain"; that is, each individual number specifies the image at a particular spatial location.

However, what we really want is a representation of the image in the "frequency domain". Instead of each individual number specifying each pixel, each number represents the amplitude of a particular frequency in the image as a whole.

The tool which converts from the "spatial domain" to the "frequency domain" is the Fourier Transform. The output of the FT will be a sequence of numbers specifying the relative contribution of different frequencies.

In order to find the maximum frequency, you perform the FT, and look at the amplitudes that you get for the high frequencies - then it is just a matter of searching from the highest frequency down until you hit your "minimum significant amplitude" threshold.

You can code your own FFT, but it is much easier in practice to use a pre-packaged library such as FFTW

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You don't scan a signal for the highest frequency and then choose your sampling frequency: You choose a sampling frequency that's high enough to capture the things you want to capture, and then you filter the signal to remove high frequencies. You throw away everything higher than half the sampling rate before you sample it.

Am I correct in assuming you could simply scan the entire pixel line (in the spatial domain) looking for a for the minimum oscillation and the inverse of that smallest oscillation would be the maximum frequency?

If you have a line of pixels, then the sampling is already done. It's too late to apply an antialiasing filter. The highest frequency that could be present is half the sampling frequency ("1/2px", I guess).

And on a more theoretical note, what if your sampling input was infinite (more like the real world)?

Yes, that's when you use the filter. First, you have a continuous function, like a real-life image (infinite sampling rate). Then you filter it to remove everything above fs/2, then you sample it at fs (digitize the image into pixels). Cameras don't actually do any filtering, which is why you get Moire patterns when you photograph bricks, etc.

alt text

If you're anti-aliasing computer graphics, you have to think of the ideal continuous mathematical function first, and think through how you would filter it and digitize it to produce the output on the screen.

For instance, if you want to generate a square wave with a computer, you can't just naively alternate between maximum and minimum values. That would be just like sampling a real life signal without filtering first. The higher harmonics wrap back into the baseband and cause lots of spurious spikes in the spectrum. You need to generate points as if they were sampled from a filtered continuous mathematical function:

alt text

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I think this article from the O'Reilly site might also be useful to you ... http://www.onlamp.com/pub/a/python/2001/01/31/numerically.html ... in there they're referring to frequency analysis of sound files but you it gives you the idea.

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I think what you need is an application of Fourier Analysis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourier_analysis). I've studied this but never used it so take it with a pinch of salt but I believe if you apply it correctly to your set of numbers you will get a set of frequencies which are components of the series and then you can pick off the highest one.

I can't point you at a piece of code that does this but I'm sure it would be out there somewhere .

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