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From a memory access standpoint... is it worth attempting an optimization like this?

int boolean_value = 0;

//magical code happens and boolean_value could be 0 or 1

if(boolean_value)
{
   //do something
}

Instead of

unsigned char boolean_value = 0;

//magical code happens and boolean_value could be 0 or 1

if(boolean_value)
{
   //do something
}

The unsigned char of course takes up only 1 byte as apposed to the integers 4 (assuming 32 bit platform here), but my understanding is that it would be faster for a processor to read the integer value from memory.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It may or may not be faster, and the speed depends on so many things that a generic answer is impossible. For example: hardware architecture, compiler, compiler options, amount of data (does it fit into L1 cache?), other things competing for the CPU, etc.

The correct answer, therefore, is: try both ways and measure for your particular case.

If measurement does not indicate that one method is significantly faster than the other, opt for the one that is clearer.

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And nothing is stopping the compiler from making the boolean larger anyhow. Both VS2010 and gcc4 widen my uint8_t members in structs - although they're probably doing that for alignment reasons alone I don't see why they wouldn't be allowed to do the same here. –  Voo May 7 '11 at 0:26

From a memory access standpoint... is it worth attempting an optimization like this?

Probably not. In almost all modern processors, memory will get fetched based on the word size of the processor. In your case, even to get one byte of memory out, your processor probably fetches the entire 32-bit word or more based on the caching of that processor. Your architecture may vary, so you will want to understand how your CPU works to gauge.

But as others have said, it doesn't hurt to try it and measure it.

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2  
You will actually get a whole cache line, 64 bytes. –  hirschhornsalz May 6 '11 at 17:41
2  
@drhirsch: you know a lot about the architecture of Doug T.'s CPU ;-) Even more than Doug T. seems to know about that of the questioner... –  Steve Jessop May 6 '11 at 17:45
1  
Let me try again: On architectures with a cache (almost all nowadays) you will get a whole cache line (for example on current amd/intel systems 64 byte). BTW, now I remember an architecture on which the memory was read in smaller parts than a processor word: The 8088 and the 68008, both 16 bit proccessors, but only having an 8 bit memory interface. –  hirschhornsalz May 6 '11 at 17:50
    
@drhisch @Steve hopefully I've qualified my answer enough :). –  Doug T. May 6 '11 at 17:54
    
I'd be surprised if you could even measure the difference between the two unless the other code was very trivial and the code spent huge lot of time in the particular code. –  davep May 6 '11 at 19:16

This is almost never a good idea. Many systems can only read word-sized chunks from memory at once, so reading a byte then masking or shifting will actually take more code space and just as much (data) memory. If you're using an obscure tiny system, measure, but in general this will actually slow down and bloat your code.

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"Many" systems not used since the 1980s maybe... Still, other than that, your advice is sound. –  R.. May 6 '11 at 19:02
    
@R: I work with 3 processors that fit the bill, though they are admittedly very obscure. –  nmichaels May 6 '11 at 19:25

Asking how much memory unsigned char takes versus int is only meaningful when it's in an array (or possibly a structure, if you're careful to order the elements to take care of alignment). As a lone variable, it's very unlikely that you save any memory at all, and the compiler is likely to generate larger code to truncate the upper bits of registers.

As a general policy, never use smaller-than-int types except in arrays unless you have a really good reason other than trying to save space.

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And maybe to designate natural bounds for the variable? –  Ioan May 6 '11 at 20:09
    
If you want to rely on the modular reduction of unsigned types, that's a valid reason - but you have to remember with default promotions, the reduction does not happen until you assign back into the "small type". If you're using a signed type, however, conversion of larger values has implementation-defined behavior and is not going to be useful. I would advise against such use of small types regardless. –  R.. May 6 '11 at 20:25

Follow the standard rules of optimization. First, don't optimize. Then test if your code needs it at some point. Then optimize that point. This link provides an excellent intro to the topic of optimization.

http://www.catb.org/~esr/writings/taoup/html/optimizationchapter.html

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Thanks for this, will definitely give it a look. –  Maximus May 6 '11 at 17:53
    
I agree with this advice in principle, but how do you know when your program is using "too much" memory? Unlike performance, memory usage is pretty easy to estimate based on what your program's actually doing, and most deviants from your estimate are going to be inefficiencies in the implementation. –  R.. May 6 '11 at 20:30
    
I guess my point was that being proactive from the beginning about not using excessive memory is a good thing, as long as you focus on the parts of your program that use the largest amounts of memory. And unless you have an array of millions of bools, int bools are probably not one of your biggest memory hogs. –  R.. May 6 '11 at 20:34

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