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i have been using jquery for a while now but only thing i know about jquery is probably a dozen of functions that get my job done. but i want to understand how jquery evolved from simpl plain javascript i.e how

$("#xyz").val();

is converted to

document.getElementById('xyz').value;

i have searched for my answer on the web but most of the writers are happy to show how you can hook on to different DOM elements with jquery, selector details etc. but nothing can be found about how actually the transition was made. can anyone refer me to some tutorial where i can get my required material?
thanks

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5  
Take a look at the source code. –  McStretch May 6 '11 at 17:38
    
It's along the lines of "why did we transition from using assembler to using C and other higher-level languages"? convenience, laziness, ahd hubris. –  Marc B May 6 '11 at 17:39
2  
@Marc B its not why. its how –  Muhammad Adeel Zahid May 6 '11 at 17:43
1  
Look at the source. $() is a HUGE object in jquery and mootools, as well as wrapping around the regular methods in domNode –  Marc B May 6 '11 at 17:49
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2 Answers

jQuery is not a compiler. jQuery does not get compiled into javascript.

.val is a method of an object. The jQuery object.

Specifically it is

function (value) {
    if (!arguments.length) {
        var elem = this[0];

        if (elem) {
            if (jQuery.nodeName(elem, "option")) {
                // attributes.value is undefined in Blackberry 4.7 but
                // uses .value. See #6932
                var val = elem.attributes.value;
                return !val || val.specified ? elem.value : elem.text;
            }

            // We need to handle select boxes special
            if (jQuery.nodeName(elem, "select")) {
                var index = elem.selectedIndex,
                    values = [],
                    options = elem.options,
                    one = elem.type === "select-one";

                // Nothing was selected
                if (index < 0) {
                    return null;
                }

                // Loop through all the selected options
                for (var i = one ? index : 0, max = one ? index + 1 : options.length; i < max; i++) {
                    var option = options[i];

                    // Don't return options that are disabled or in a disabled optgroup
                    if (option.selected && (jQuery.support.optDisabled ? !option.disabled : option.getAttribute("disabled") === null) && (!option.parentNode.disabled || !jQuery.nodeName(option.parentNode, "optgroup"))) {

                        // Get the specific value for the option
                        value = jQuery(option).val();

                        // We don't need an array for one selects
                        if (one) {
                            return value;
                        }

                        // Multi-Selects return an array
                        values.push(value);
                    }
                }

                return values;
            }

            // Handle the case where in Webkit "" is returned instead of "on" if a value isn't specified
            if (rradiocheck.test(elem.type) && !jQuery.support.checkOn) {
                return elem.getAttribute("value") === null ? "on" : elem.value;
            }

            // Everything else, we just grab the value
            return (elem.value || "").replace(rreturn, "");

        }

        return undefined;
    }

    var isFunction = jQuery.isFunction(value);

    return this.each(function (i) {
        var self = jQuery(this),
            val = value;

        if (this.nodeType !== 1) {
            return;
        }

        if (isFunction) {
            val = value.call(this, i, self.val());
        }

        // Treat null/undefined as ""; convert numbers to string
        if (val == null) {
            val = "";
        } else if (typeof val === "number") {
            val += "";
        } else if (jQuery.isArray(val)) {
            val = jQuery.map(val, function (value) {
                return value == null ? "" : value + "";
            });
        }

        if (jQuery.isArray(val) && rradiocheck.test(this.type)) {
            this.checked = jQuery.inArray(self.val(), val) >= 0;

        } else if (jQuery.nodeName(this, "select")) {
            var values = jQuery.makeArray(val);

            jQuery("option", this).each(function () {
                this.selected = jQuery.inArray(jQuery(this).val(), values) >= 0;
            });

            if (!values.length) {
                this.selectedIndex = -1;
            }

        } else {
            this.value = val;
        }
    });
}

If we break the above wall down we can get

function (value) {
    if (arguments.length === 0) {
         return (this[0].value || "")
    }
    this.value = val;
    return this;
}

Of course jQuery has a lot more code to deal with various edge cases and special things.

In essence jQuery takes a selector. finds the elements. Stores them internally then returns you an object.

This object has all kinds of methods that allow you to mutate the underlying dom objects stored internally. .val is one of them.

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There are plenty of articles on how jQuery works (there are screencasts too).

jQuery, as you've noticed, is basically a bunch of methods operating on an array of elements. It is also intended to normalize browser differences under the hood.

Take the basic usage $("#xyz").val();

I can even tell you what jQuery is doing behind the scenes, but I don't think you really want to know. :)

var jQuery = function( selector, context ) {
        // The jQuery object is actually just the init constructor 'enhanced'
        return new jQuery.fn.init( selector, context );
    },

// ...

jQuery.fn = jQuery.prototype = {
    init: function( selector, context ) {
       // ...
    },
    // ...
};

// Give the init function the jQuery prototype for later instantiation
jQuery.fn.init.prototype = jQuery.fn;

So basically $(selector) means newjQuery.fn.init(selector), it's just a shortcut for easier typing (and also to prevent the "bug" where fogetting new binds this to the global object, instead of the current instance).

Also, the so-called plug-ins added as jQuery.fn.ext are mapped to jQuery.fn.init.prototype as you can see in the last line, it's another shortcut. So when you call $(selector) everything that is added to jQuery.fn will also be on jQuery.fn.init.prototype and so the new instance will have those methods as $(selector).ext(...).

// as you use it today
jQuery.fn.plugin = function ( ... ) { ... }
$(selector).plugin( ... )

// as it would be without shortcuts
jQuery.fn.init.prototype.plugin = function ( ... ) { ... }
(new jQuery.fn.init(selector)).plugin( ... )
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