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Does anyone know if there is any free and open source library that has implemented these two functions the way they are defined in matlab?

Thanks

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I cast my close vote in error. Although this question is similar, your question is not exactly a duplicate, as you're asking for free/open libraries, whereas the other person just wanted to port MATLAB's implementation to C. –  git rm May 6 '11 at 18:39
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7 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Or you can do it yourself by typing type fftshift and recoding that in C++. It's not that complicated of Matlab code.

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FFTHIFT / IFFTSHIFT is a fancy way of doing CIRCSHIFT. You can verify that FFTSHIFT can be rewritten as CIRCSHIFT as following. You can define macros in C/C++ to punt FFTSHIFT to CIRCSHIFT.

A = rand(m, n);
mm = floor(m / 2);
nn = floor(n / 2);
% All three of the following should provide zeros.
CIRCSHIFT(A,[mm, nn]) - FFTSHIFT(A)
CIRCSHIFT(A,[mm,  0]) - FFTSHIFT(A,1)
CIRCSHIFT(A,[ 0, nn]) - FFTSHIFT(A, 2) 

Similar equivalents can be found for IFFTSHIFT.

Circular shift can be implemented very simply with the following code (Can be improved with parallel versions ofcourse).

template<class ty>
void circshift(ty *out, const ty *in, int xdim, int ydim, int xshift, int yshift)
{
  for (int i =0; i < xdim; i++) {
    ii = (i + xshift) % xdim;
    for (int j = 0; j < ydim; j++) {
      jj = (j + yshift) % ydim;
      out[ii * ydim + jj] = in[i * ydim + j];
    }
  }
}

And then

#define fftshift(out, in, x, y) circshift(out, in, x, y, (x/2), (y/2))

This was done a bit impromptu. Bear with me if there are any formatting / syntactical problems.

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Normally, centering the FFT is done with v(k)=v(k)(-1)*k in the time domain. Shifting in the frequency domain is a poor substitute, for mathematical reasons and for computational efficiency. See pp 27 of: http://show.docjava.com/pub/document/jot/v8n6.pdf

I am not sure why Matlab documentation does it the way they do, they give no technical reference.

Ciao, - DL

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Octave uses fftw to implement (i)fftshift.

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2  
fftw doesnt have any API to the shifting functions I dont think –  Derek May 6 '11 at 18:20
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You can use kissfft. It's reasonable fast, extremely simple to use, and free. Arranging the output like you want it requires only to:

a) shift by (-dim_x/2, -dim_y/2, ...), with periodic boundary conditions

b) FFT or IFFT

c) shift back by (dim_x/2, dim_y/2, ...) , with periodic boundary conditions

d) scale ? (according to your needs IFFT*FFT will scale the function by dim_x*dim_y*... by default)

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Try this. And never, never recode matlab code in C++, understand what it does and write from scratch.

template<class T> void ifftShift(T *out, const T* in, size_t nx, size_t ny)
{
    const size_t hlen1 = (ny+1)/2;
    const size_t hlen2 = ny/2;
    const size_t shft1 = ((nx+1)/2)*ny + hlen1;
    const size_t shft2 = (nx/2)*ny + hlen2;

    const T* src = in;
    for(T* tgt = out; tgt < out + shft1 - hlen1; tgt += ny, src += ny) { // (nx+1)/2 times
        copy(src, src+hlen1, tgt + shft2);          //1->4
        copy(src+hlen1, src+ny, tgt+shft2-hlen2); } //2->3
    src = in;
    for(T* tgt = out; tgt < out + shft2 - hlen2; tgt += ny, src += ny ){ // nx/2 times
        copy(src+shft1, src+shft1+hlen2, tgt);         //4->1
        copy(src+shft1-hlen1, src+shft1, tgt+hlen2); } //3->2
};
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Possible this code may help. It perform fftshift/ifftshift only for 1D array within one buffer. Algorithm of forward and backward fftshift for even number of elements is fully identical.

void swap(complex *v1, complex *v2)
{
    complex tmp = *v1;
    *v1 = *v2;
    *v2 = tmp;
}

void fftshift(complex *data, int count)
{
    int k = 0;
    int c = (int) floor((float)count/2);
    // For odd and for even numbers of element use different algorithm
    if (count % 2 == 0)
    {
        for (k = 0; k < c; k++)
            swap(&data[k], &data[k+c]);
    }
    else
    {
        complex tmp = data[0];
        for (k = 0; k < c; k++)
        {
            data[k] = data[c + k + 1];
            data[c + k + 1] = data[k + 1];
        }
        data[c] = tmp;
    }
}

void ifftshift(complex *data, int count)
{
    int k = 0;
    int c = (int) floor((float)count/2);
    if (count % 2 == 0)
    {
        for (k = 0; k < c; k++)
            swap(&data[k], &data[k+c]);
    }
    else
    {
        complex tmp = data[count - 1];
        for (k = c-1; k >= 0; k--)
        {
            data[c + k + 1] = data[k];
            data[k] = data[c + k];
        }
        data[c] = tmp;
    }
}
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