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Thread currentThread=Thread.currentThread();
        public void run()
        {               

             while(!shutdown)
            {                               
                try
                {
                    System.out.println(currentThread.isAlive());
                Thread.interrupted();

                System.out.println(currentThread.isAlive());
                if(currentThread.isAlive()==false)
                {
                    shutdown=true;
                }
                }
                catch(Exception e)
                {
                    currentThread.interrupt();
                }                   
            }
        }

    });
    thread.start();
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could you check the above code and help me to kill the thread –  greeshma May 6 '11 at 17:55
2  
See this post forward.com.au/javaProgramming/HowToStopAThread.html –  Bala R May 6 '11 at 17:55
    
Have a look at Best Practice for killing a JavaME 1.2 thread?, it may help. –  Piccolomomo May 6 '11 at 17:57
1  
Uh...is this even compilable code? –  mre May 6 '11 at 17:58

3 Answers 3

The alternative to calling stop is to use interrupt to signal to the thread that you want it to finish what it's doing. (This assumes the thread you want to stop is well-behaved, if it ignores InterruptedExceptions by eating them immediately after they are thrown and doesn't check the interrupted status then you are back to using stop().)

Here's some code I wrote as an answer to a threading question here, it's an example of how thread interruption works:

public class HelloWorld {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        Thread thread = new Thread(new Runnable() {

            public void run() {
                try {
                    while (!Thread.currentThread().isInterrupted()) {
                        Thread.sleep(5000);
                        System.out.println("Hello World!");
                    }
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
                }
            }
        });
        thread.start();
        System.out.println("press any key to quit");
        System.in.read();
        thread.interrupt();
    }
}

Some things to be aware of:

  • Interrupting causes sleep() and wait() to immediately throw, otherwise you are stuck waiting for the sleep time to pass.

  • Note that there is no need for a separate boolean flag.

  • The thread being stopped cooperates by checking the interrupted status and catching InterruptedExceptions outside the while loop (using it to exit the loop). Interruption is one place where it's ok to use an exception for flow control, that is the whole point of it.

  • Setting interrupt on the current thread in the catch block is technically best-practice but is overkill for this example, because there is nothing else that needs the interrupt flag set.

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@Nathan: +1, if I had seen this answer, I wouldn't have even bothered writing one of my own! gg –  mre May 6 '11 at 18:33
    
First of all, this code assumes that a sleep or other Interruptible blocking call is going to be used. This need not be the case. The code could be to do some complicated calculations. Using Thread interrupts need more care. Some IOs can also be interrupted, if there are multiple such IOs, we may need to clean up objects carefully, etc. I would suggest using a flag variable as a safer option generally. –  Raze May 6 '11 at 18:37
    
@Raze: wouldn't simply catching blocking I/O interrupts and interrupting the current thread suffice? –  mre May 6 '11 at 18:42
    
It will definitely stop the thread, but this of this in the run() method: { try { while(...) {byte[] input = getChunkFromNetworkWhichHasCriticalData(); alertUser(input); } } catch(ClosedByInterruptException cbie) {...} }. Two points: Not all IO calls are interrupted, and so it may never exit. If IO call which will interrupt is called, then handling partially obtained data may be difficult. In many cases, like video streaming, this is not a concern. If there are multiple interruptible points in the code, it may get even more complex. –  Raze May 6 '11 at 19:07
    
@Raze: care is definitely called for. that is why I left the Thread.currentThread().interrupt() in the example, to demonstrate making sure the interrupt flag is maintained. In any case, for the OP's purposes I don't think the flag is necessary, though it doesn't hurt anything and your example is well-implemented. –  Nathan Hughes May 6 '11 at 19:10

Typically, a thread is terminated when it's interrupted. So, why not use the native boolean? Try isInterrupted():

   Thread t = new Thread(new Runnable(){
        @Override
        public void run() {
            while(!Thread.currentThread().isInterrupted()){
                // do stuff         
            }   
        }});
    t.start();

    // Sleep a second, and then interrupt
    try {
        Thread.sleep(1000);
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {}
    t.interrupt();
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+1, people like to roll their own (boolean) but you have to make it volatile and blar blar blar... using a standard interruption policy like isInterrupted feels more elegant :D –  Toby May 18 '11 at 8:30

Good way to do it would be to use a boolean flag to signal the thread.

class MyRunnable implements Runnable {

    public volatile boolean stopThread = false;

    public void run() {
            while(!stopThread) {
                    // Thread code here
            }
    }

}

Create a Instantiate MyRunnable, say, myrunnable. Make a thread out of this, and start it. When you want to flag it to stop, call myrunnable.stopThread = true. This way, it doesn't get stopped in the middle of something, only where we expect it to get stopped.

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