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I've seen several different approaches to memory management in iOS as regards releasing properties. After some debate with colleagues, the pros and cons have become muddled in my head.

I'm hoping to get a summary of pros and cons that will allow myself and others to easily choose a default approach while still understanding when to make exceptions. Here are the 3 variations I've seen:

Assume @property (nonatomic, retain) MyObject *foo;

// Release-only. Seems to be the favored approach in Apple's sample code.
- (void)dealloc {
    [foo release];
    [super dealloc];
}

// Property accessor set to nil.
- (void)dealloc {
    self.foo = nil;
    [super dealloc];
}

// Release, then nil.
- (void)dealloc {
    [foo release];
    foo = nil;
    [super dealloc];
}

If you have a different variation to add, comment here and I'll edit the op.

share|improve this question
    
+1 a good question about a somewhat mysterious topic/convention. I personally release within dealloc, and set properties to nil in the viewDidUnload method (for non-IBOutlet properties). I don't know if there is a definitive answer to this, but I look forward to reading some answers. – Stuart May 6 '11 at 19:53
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Versions (1): is the best. Each of the others have attributes that may be harmful.

Version (2): It is generally advised not to use accessors in dealloc (or init). The reasoning behind this is that the object is in the process of being torn-down (or created) and is in an inconsistent state. This is especially true if you are writing a library where someone else may later override an accessor unaware that it may be called when the object is in an inconsistent state. (Of course even Apple sometimes breaks this rule -[UIView initWithFrame:] calls -[UIView setFrame:] if the argument is not CGRectZero which can make for fun debugging.

Version (3); Setting the ivar to nil serves no useful purpose, indeed it may mask an error and make debugging more difficult. To see why this is true, consider the following piece of code, assume myObject has a version (3) dealloc.

FastMovingTrain* train = [[FastMoving alloc] init];
MyObject* myObject = [[MyObject alloc] init];
myObject.foo = train;
[train release];
// my myObject.foo is the only thing retaining train
...

....
[myObject release];

// Because of version (3) dealloc if myObject
// points to the dealloced memory this line 
// will silently fail... 
[myObject.foo applyBrakes];

Interestingly enough this code provides an opportunity to demonstrate when setting a variable to nil after a release does make sense. The code can be made more resilient by modifying it as follows.

FastMovingTrain* train = [[FastMoving alloc] init];
MyObject* myObject = [[MyObject alloc] init];
myObject.foo = train;
[train release];
// my myObject.foo is the only thing retaining train
...

....
[myObject release];
myObject = nil;

// This assertion will fail.
NSAssert(myObject, @"myObject must not be nil");
[myObject.foo applyBrakes];

Just my $0.02.

share|improve this answer
    
I was hoping for a little more precision here. For example, is it "not much benefit" or "no benefit at all"? If "not much", what small benefit is there? It sounds like #2 is a bad idea, so how then does one choose between #1 and #3. Remember, the idea here is to provide objective facts that a team of programmers could use to inform their coding guidelines. – clozach May 13 '11 at 18:44
    
I suppose that's a fair point. The answer is no benefit whatsoever and it may even be harmful. I'll edit the answer. – idz May 13 '11 at 20:25
    
Incidentally the Google Objective-C style guide has a lot of sensible advice google-styleguide.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/objcguide.xml it also links to the Apple coding guidelines too. – idz May 13 '11 at 20:52

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