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A derives directly from Object class and neither A or Object overload == operator, so why doesn't next code cause an error:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        A a1 = new A();
        A a2 = new A();

        if (a1 == a2) ... ;
    }
}

class A { }

thanx

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Beyond the ellipse, why would you expect a comparison of two instances of the same class to cause an error? – Thomas May 6 '11 at 18:58
1  
Btw, the Object class does overload the ==. It uses the Object.ReferenceEquals method to compare the two instances. – Thomas May 6 '11 at 18:59
1  
@Abe Miessler - :P. Doah. Damn dirty typos... – Thomas May 6 '11 at 19:01
1  
@user702769 - Correct. The default implementation of Object.Equals which is called by ==, is Object.ReferenceEquals. I.e., by default the base class for all classes compares equality by determining whether the two instances are the same instance in memory. – Thomas May 6 '11 at 20:13
1  
The predefined implementation of the == operator performs a reference equality check. The Object.Equals method also performs a reference equality check. I'm pretty sure that == does not call Object.Equals. – Lee Gunn May 6 '11 at 20:53
up vote 6 down vote accepted

A derives directly from Object class and neither A or Object overload == operator, so why doesn't next code cause an error?

As with your other question, you seem to have some strange belief that whether an overloaded operator exists has any bearing on whether an operator can be meaningfully chosen. It does not.

Again, to resolve this situation overload resolution first attempts to determine if there is a user-defined operator defined on either of the operands. As you note, there is not.

Overload resolution then falls back on the built-in operators. As I mentioned in your other question, the built-in operators are the equality operators on int, uint, long, ulong, bool, char, float, double, decimal, object, string, all delegate types and all enum types, plus the lifted-to-nullable versions of all the value types.

Given those operators we must now determine the applicable ones. There is no implicit conversion from "A" to any of the value types, to any of the nullable value types, to string, or to any delegate type.

The only remaining applicable candidate is object.

If overload resolution chooses the equality operator that compares two objects, additional constraints must be met. In particular, both operands must either be null or a reference type, or a type parameter not constrained to be a value type. That constraint is met. Also, if the two sides have types then the operand types must have some sort of compatibility relationship; you can't do "myString == myException" because there is no relationship between string and Exception. There is a relationship between "A" and "A", namely, they are identical.

Therefore the reference equality operator is chosen, and the == means "compare these two object expressions by reference".

I am mystified as to why you believe having a user-defined == operator has anything to do with this, either in this question or your other question. The absence of such a method does not prevent the compiler from generating whatever code it likes for this expression. Can you explain?

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Can you explain? Ok, I'll explain ... I'm dumb :) Some users have suggested that reference equality operator calls Object.Equals. Is that correct? – user702769 May 6 '11 at 21:13
3  
@user702769: Not really. The compiler does not generate a reference equality operation as a call to Object.ReferenceEquals, and it certainly does not call virtual method Object.Equals. Rather, it puts two managed references on the IL stack and compares them for equality directly. The jitter will jit that into a direct pointer comparison. – Eric Lippert May 6 '11 at 21:51
    
thank you all for your help – user702769 May 6 '11 at 22:05

Because by default, the == operator compares the references (memory locations) of the objects a1 and a2. And because they're different instances of class A, the expression a1 == a2 always evaluates to false in your example.

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Objects have a default implementation of the == operator that checks if they refer to the same object (reference comparison). So there's no reason for it to be an error. The operator does have a meaning.

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»Objects have a default implementation of the == operator« I checked whether Object class defines operator overload method for == operator, and couldn't find anything. Or are you saying that under the hood compiler calls Object.Equals? – user702769 May 6 '11 at 20:03
1  
Yeah, technically that's what I meant. It's not actually ==, but in this particular case I don't think it matters one way or the other. – Tesserex May 6 '11 at 20:09

Because Object has a default implementation comparing references.

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I checked whether Object class defines operator overload method for == operator and couldn't find anything. Or are you saying that under the hood compiler calls Object.equals? – user702769 May 6 '11 at 20:03

The base's == operator is called that why its not giving any error.

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Where is this base's == operator defined? – user702769 May 6 '11 at 20:03

By default, the operator == tests for reference equality by determining if two references indicate the same object, so reference types do not need to implement operator == in order to gain this functionality.

From: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173147(v=vs.80).aspx

The important bit concerning your question being:

reference types do not need to implement operator == in order to gain this functionality

share|improve this answer
    
But where does Object class define operator overload method for == operator? – user702769 May 6 '11 at 20:05
    
The Object class doesn't define an operator. It doesn't need to...as there is already a "global" (if you like) == operator for reference types. – Lee Gunn May 6 '11 at 20:58

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