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#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class A {
    public:
        A ();
        virtual ~A();
};

class B: protected A {
    public:
        virtual ~B ();
};

int main() {
    A* pb = new B;//A is inaccessable base of B
    return 0;
}

when I run the code above, it tells me A is inaccessable base of B, the pb is a pointer, which pointer to the B, what is the problem?

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10 Answers 10

Class B derives from class A, but marks it as being protected. This means that only subclasses of B 'see' that B derives from A.

Since the main routine is not a subclass of B, it only sees B, not that B derives from A. Therefore, you can't cast a B-pointer to an A-pointer.

To solve it, change it to this:

class B: public A {
public:
    virtual ~B ();
};
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1  
+1 For the best explination of why his code was incorrect. –  Chad May 6 '11 at 20:27
    
+1 and just to supplement, a quote from the standard - 11.2.1 ... If a class is declared to be a base class for another class using the protected access specifier, the public and protected members of the base class are accessible as protected members of the derived class ... –  Mahesh May 6 '11 at 20:33
    
when I change it as public, it still have problem, then it says "undefined reference " to "Base::Base()" –  cong May 6 '11 at 20:34
    
@cong - Have you provided the constructor's definition. A(); is just declaration. –  Mahesh May 6 '11 at 20:36
    
@Mahesh that is what I want to ask, because I saw some example in some website,they just provide declaration of constructor, but no definition, I was wonder if it is legal –  user707549 May 6 '11 at 20:39

B is protected inherited from A, thus only subclasses of B 'knows' it's an A. the static main() doesn't 'know' it, because it does not inherit from B.
you can access B as an A in this situation:

class C: B {
    void foo() {
        A* pb = new B;
    }
};

if you need it in the main, you would need to change B to public inherit from A

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It's because you inherited from A with protected. Change it to public and you will get what you expected.

See the C++ FAQ section 24.5 here.

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The problem is the protected inheritance. B is not an A. B has an A. See this FAQ for more details.

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If you change

class B: protected A

to

class B: public A

does it work?

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The problem is that you inherit B from A as protected, and therefore outside code is not allowed to 'know' that B inherits from A. Replace protected with public, and the code should compile.

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Derive B from public A, not protected A:

class B: public A
{
public:
    virtual ~B ();
};
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You're using protected inheritance. Protected, when applied to members, means that "derived classes can access, but external callers cannot". And when applied to inheritance, it means... exactly the same thing.

So within the B class, you know that it is derived from A, and can cast to an A* and back

BUt outside of B (for example, in the main function), the inheritance isn't visible, and so you can't convert a B* to A*.

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The property of Inheritance rules out the possibility of derivation of a protected parent class into a subclass. Therefore, deriving the attributes of class A to class B isn't really going to happen in the code. Unless you change protected to public in line #10, so that the protocols are followed, and the code looks like this:

class B: public A
{
public:
    virtual ~B ();
};
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#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class A {
    public:
        A () {};
        virtual ~A();
};

class B: public A {
    public:
        B() {};
        virtual ~B ();
};

int main() {
    A* pb = new B;
    return 0;
}

This seems to work. In your example you make B ready for future inheritance, protected inherit makes A protected and only B methods can see the A.

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