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I have a very big .txt file and i want to write a ruby script to filter through some data. Basically I want to iterate over each line and then store the individual words in the line in an array and then operate on the words. however I am not able to get each word separately in a array

tracker_file.each_line do|line|
arr = "#{line}"

I can get the entire line like this but how about the individual words?

Thanks

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5 Answers 5

Use the split method on a string.

irb(main):001:0> line = "one two three"
=> "one two three"
irb(main):002:0> line.split
=> ["one", "two", "three"]

So your example would be:

tracker_file.each_line do |line|
  arr = line.split
  # ... do stuff with arr
end
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tracker_file.each_line do |line|
  line.scan(/[\w']+/) do |word|
    ...
  end
end

If you do not need to iterate over lines, you can directly iterate over words:

tracker_file.read.scan(/[\w']+/) do |word|
    ...
end
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You can do:

tracker_file.each_line do |line|
    arr = line.split
# Then perform operations on the array
end

The split method will split a string into an array based on a delimiter, in this case, a space.

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If you're reading something written in English and the text may contain hyphens, semicolons, spaces, periods, etc. you might consider a regular expression, such as the following:

/[a-zA-Z]+(\-[a-zA-Z]+)*/

to extract the words instead.

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You don't have to use IO#each_line, you could also use IO#each(separator_string)

Another option is to use IO#gets:

while word = tracker_file.gets(/separator_regexp/)
  # use the word
end
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