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I'm trying to determine worst case disk speed, so I wrote the following function.

static public decimal MBytesPerSec(string volume)
{
    string filename = volume + "\\writetest.tmp";

    if (System.IO.File.Exists(filename))
        System.IO.File.Delete(filename);

    System.IO.StreamWriter file = new System.IO.StreamWriter(filename);

    char[] data = new char[64000];
    Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
    watch.Start();

    int i = 0;

    for (; i < 1000; i++)
    {
        file.Write(data);
        if (watch.ElapsedMilliseconds > 2000)
        {
            break;
        }
    }

    watch.Stop();
    file.Close();

    System.IO.File.Delete(volume + "\\test.txt");
    decimal mbytessec = (i * 64 / watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    return mbytessec;
}

The function works OK, but the writes are getting cached, so the speed is not worst case.

In WIN32 C++, I would simply create the file with FILE_FLAG_NO_BUFFERING, FILE_FLAG_WRITE_THROUGH options, and then make sure to follow the non-cached writing rules (write to the file at sector size offsets, with minimum of 4k writes)

I found one article that discusses the .NET technique.

So I wrote a new function (ignore the math errors).

static public decimal MBytesPerSecNonCached(string volume)
{
    const FileOptions FILE_FLAG_NO_BUFFERING = (FileOptions)0x20000000;

    string filename = volume + "\\writetest.tmp";

    using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(filename, FileMode.OpenOrCreate, FileAccess.ReadWrite, FileShare.None, 1024, FileOptions.WriteThrough | FILE_FLAG_NO_BUFFERING))
    {
        byte[] data = new byte[65535];
        int i = 0;

        Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
        watch.Start();

        for (; i < 1000; i++)
        {
            fs.Write(data, 0, 65535);
            if (watch.ElapsedMilliseconds > 2000)
            {
                break;
            }
        }

        watch.Stop();
        fs.Close();

        System.IO.File.Delete(filename);

        decimal mbytessec = (i * 64 / watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);

        return mbytessec;
    }
}

This function works for 4k, 16K and 32K write sizes, but once I try 64K write sizes, I get an exception:

IO operation will not work. Most likely the file will become too long or the handle was not opened to support synchronous IO operations.

So, how can I fix this so I can test with larger than 32KB write sizes (64KB to 4096KB)?

share|improve this question
2  
The .NET framework was developed to remove those decisions from the developer and allow the framework to manage that "for you". The good news is, for 99% of needs it really is pretty good at it. The bad news, it doesn't want to give you that control when you feel you need it (or just plain WANT it). The solution, if you are keen on doing it 'your self' is to use PInvoke to address the Win32 dlls and then do it the same way you would in C++. – Cos Callis May 6 '11 at 21:23
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Try some unmanaged code:

[DllImport("kernel32", SetLastError = true)]
        static extern unsafe SafeFileHandle CreateFile(
            string FileName,           // file name
            uint DesiredAccess,        // access mode
            uint ShareMode,            // share mode
            IntPtr SecurityAttributes, // Security Attr
            uint CreationDisposition,  // how to create
            uint FlagsAndAttributes,   // file attributes
            IntPtr hTemplate // template file  
            );
const uint FILE_FLAG_NO_BUFFERING = 0x20000000;

SafeFileHandle handle = CreateFile("filename",
                            (uint)FileAccess.Write,
                            (uint)FileShare.None,
                            IntPtr.Zero,
                            (uint)FileMode.Open,
                             FILE_FLAG_NO_BUFFERING,
                            IntPtr.Zero);

var unBufferedStream = new FileStream(handle,FileAccess.Read,blockSize,false);

now you should have access to an unbuffered stream which you can read and write however you please with no constraints

For the record....you can also disable caching like this:

[DllImport("KERNEL32", SetLastError = true)]
        public extern static int DeviceIoControl(IntPtr hDevice, uint IoControlCode,
            IntPtr lpInBuffer, uint InBufferSize,
            IntPtr lpOutBuffer, uint nOutBufferSize,
            ref uint lpBytesReturned,
            IntPtr lpOverlapped);
        [DllImport("KERNEL32", SetLastError = true)]
        public extern static int CloseHandle(
        IntPtr hObject);

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
        public struct DISK_CACHE_INFORMATION
        {            
            public byte ParametersSavable;            
            public byte ReadCacheEnabled;            
            public byte WriteCacheEnabled;
            public int ReadRetentionPriority;//DISK_CACHE_RETENTION_PRIORITY = enum = int
            public int WriteRetentionPriority;//DISK_CACHE_RETENTION_PRIORITY = enum = int
            public Int16 DisablePrefetchTransferLength;//WORD            
            public byte PrefetchScalar;            
        }

public void SetDiskCache(byte val)
        {
            IntPtr h = CreateFile("\\\\.\\PHYSICALDRIVE0", (uint)FileAccess.Read | (uint)FileAccess.Write, (uint)FileShare.Write, IntPtr.Zero, (uint)FileMode.Open, 0, IntPtr.Zero);
            DISK_CACHE_INFORMATION sInfo = new DISK_CACHE_INFORMATION();
            IntPtr ptrout = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(Marshal.SizeOf(sInfo));
            Marshal.StructureToPtr(sInfo, ptrout, true);            
            uint dwWritten = 0;
            int ret = DeviceIoControl(h,IOCTL_DISK_GET_CACHE_INFORMATION,IntPtr.Zero,0,ptrout,(uint)Marshal.SizeOf(sInfo),ref dwWritten,IntPtr.Zero);            
            sInfo = (DISK_CACHE_INFORMATION)Marshal.PtrToStructure(ptrout,typeof(DISK_CACHE_INFORMATION));            
            sInfo.ReadCacheEnabled = val;
            // acuma trimite structura modificata
            IntPtr ptrin = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(Marshal.SizeOf(sInfo));
            Marshal.StructureToPtr(sInfo, ptrin, true);            
            ret = DeviceIoControl(h, IOCTL_DISK_SET_CACHE_INFORMATION, ptrin, (uint)Marshal.SizeOf(sInfo), IntPtr.Zero, 0, ref dwWritten, IntPtr.Zero);            
            CloseHandle(h);            
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Tudor I'll give it a try tomorrow, and see what happens. I'm curious how long disabling the cache on a drive lasts. would be a mean trick to play on someone ;) – Ivan Bohannon May 8 '11 at 18:09
    
The buffered stream in this unmanaged code still gives the same error: IO operation will not work. Most likely the file will become too long or the handle was not opened to support synchronous IO operations. – emmanuel Dec 20 '14 at 13:40

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