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I am having problems with template class specialization, see the code bellow, please.

template <typename T>
class Point
{
    private
            T x, y;
            typedef T Type;

    public:

            Point ( const T & x_, const T & y_) : x ( x_ ), y ( y_ ) {}
};

template <typename Item>
struct TItems
{
    typedef std::vector <Item> Type;
};


template <typename Item>
class Container
{
    protected:
            typename TItems <Item>::Type items;

    public:
            typedef Item type;
};   

Is it possible to specialize Container class for Point ?

Updated question:

I tried the following code, is it valid?

template <typename T>
class Container < Point <T>  >
{

};

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
return 0;

Container <Point <double> > points;
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can, yes, but your syntax isn't quite right. As it stands, the compiler doesn't know what T is, so you have to tell it that it is a template parameter:

 template<typename T>
 class Container<Point<T> > { };
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Thanks, I corrected my code at the same time as you posted the answer :-) –  Johnas May 6 '11 at 21:02

yes you can specialize your class with that type Point <T> .

Edit:

I tried the following code, is it valid?

If you've tried the following code ,don't you know whether it compiled or not ? 0_o

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
Container <Point <double> > points;
return 0; // return should be here nor program will exit before creating Container <Point <double> > points;
}

r

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_tmain is not a legal function name, so the mere fact that it compiles doesn't really offer much help as to whether or not the code is legal. –  Dennis Zickefoose May 6 '11 at 21:06
    
I think he is using visual studio. –  user72424 May 6 '11 at 21:07
    
@Dennis, how is _tmain not a legal function name? It's a valid identifier, and not even a reserved one. –  Ben Voigt May 6 '11 at 21:26
1  
@Ben: in the global scope, names beginning with an underscore are reserved. The important thing is that simply compiling code hints at accuracy, but does not guarentee it. –  Dennis Zickefoose May 6 '11 at 21:43
2  
@Dennis: Reserved for the implementation, and this implementation specifies that it is a macro which expands to the name of the entry point (main or wmain). –  Ben Voigt May 6 '11 at 23:25

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