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I know that the linkedlist is not threadsafe and at work I ve been asked to write a bare bones thread safe linkedlist.

Because of various complications which I wont go through I cannot simply wrap a LinkedList but need to write an implementation of a LinkedList

I am guessing I need this but how can I actually implement an enumerator (for the linedlist) in a thread safe way?

    public class LinkedlistNode
    {
        private LinkedlistNode next;
        private T item;
        /// <summary>
        /// Constructor for a new LinklistNode
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="node">The node item to create</param>
        public LinkedlistNode(T node)
        {
            next = null;
            item = node;
        }
        /// <summary>
        /// Shows the next item in the collection (or shows null for the the last item)
        /// </summary>
        public LinkedlistNode Next
        {
            get { return next; }
            set { next = value; }
        }
        /// <summary>
        /// The contents of the list
        /// </summary>
        public T Item         
        {             
            get { return item; }             
            set { item = value; }         
        }            
    }
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3  
It looks like you've got a singly-linked list there. If you make it immutable by taking out the setters on your properties, your linked list will be inherently thread-safe. You can find one already implemented for you in FSharp.Core.dll. –  Joel Mueller May 6 '11 at 21:07
1  
I need to be able to add and remove items :) –  Jack Kada May 6 '11 at 21:09
1  
What should happen if another thread tries to add or remove an item from the list, while a thread is enumerating over it? –  Lasse V. Karlsen May 6 '11 at 21:13
    
To remove items efficiently, you'll need a doubly-linked list. Otherwise you have to get the owner of the node you're removing by starting at the beginning and traversing until you find one whose Next item is the current node. A Previous property takes that linear operation and makes it constant. –  KeithS May 6 '11 at 21:16
1  
Adding an item to the front is easy with a singly-linked immutable list - just create a node with a next pointing to the first node of your existing list. Removing a node (or adding in the middle) would require regenerating all the nodes that come before the node in question, it's true. –  Joel Mueller May 6 '11 at 21:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Good start. I would doubly-link the list, first of all, by including a Previous property similar to Next.

The major problem with making a linked list thread-safe is that, unlike an indexed collection, there are up to three objects that must be locked at the same time to perform adds and deletes. This increases the likelihood of deadlocks if, for instance, another thread is enumerating through the list; the add/remove thread needs to lock the fourth node to delete the fifth node, while the enumerating thread has already locked the fourth item and needs to lock the fifth. A singly-linked list would have the same problem, because that algorithm would require another enumeration top determine the "previous" node, which would end up blocked trying to get to the fourth item which is already locked by the first enumerator waiting to get to the fifth item.

I guess there's a big question to be asked: how exactly do you need to add and remove items? If this implementation will be used as the collection behind a Stack or Queue, it becomes MUCH easier to make it thread-safe, as enumerating the list will not be allowed, and of nodes currently in the list, only the endpoint node(s) (one for a Stack, 2 for a Queue) need to be locked when adding/removing, and unless the stack or queue only has one item, locking those nodes will only block other threads attempting to add or remove.

If this is a full linked list implementation, requiring similar functionality to a List in terms of navigating to any item and adding and removing from anywhere, then I think your best bet is to hide the nodes behind a wrapper that will lock itself before performing any operation, much like Interlocked does with integral types. This is not a "fine-grained" approach by any means; any thread that wants to do anything to the list will have to wait its turn. There are just too many chances for deadlocks when trying to allow multiple threads simultaneous access.

Your only hope for fine-grained, thread-safe locking without deadlocks is to always acquire locks in the same order the list will be enumerated, and to only allow iteration in one direction. Basically, that requires you to hide the "Previous" node of a doubly-linked list, and allow nodes to acquire "persistent" locks on other nodes.

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What three objects need to be locked and how do you do thread safety in an enumerator? I am aware of the problem with the client calling GetSize and then assuming the list has not changed. –  Jack Kada May 6 '11 at 21:55
    
When removing a node, you must lock the node prior to it, the node you are removing, and the node after it. No other thread should be able to obtain a reference to any of those nodes while the operation is occurring. –  KeithS May 6 '11 at 22:38

There is an extensive answer to the implementation of SLLs in mulithreaded situations in this Question/Answer:

Thread-safe deletion of a linked list node, using the fine-grained approach

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