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int main ()
{
    int arr[10][1];
    arr[1][0]=44;
    arr[0][1]=55;
    printf("%i",arr[1][0]);
    return 0;
}

Should this print out "55" or "44"???

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4  
This should cause nasal demons. –  Chris Lutz May 6 '11 at 21:39
1  
This is not a HOMEWORK Mr. Strohm.. I thought i knew about C arrays but that simple code printed out a result i did not expect (which is 55 in that case). So i am looking for an explanation.. –  Ancc May 6 '11 at 21:40
3  
UB FTW –  pmg May 6 '11 at 21:44
    
If you knew about C arrays, where did you expect that 55 to be stored? –  Jim Balter May 7 '11 at 0:14

2 Answers 2

There is no such element as arr[0][1] -- just as there is no element arr[10][0] -- array indices are zero based.

If you declare:

int arr[10][2];

Your code will work as you intended.

With the declaration

int arr[10][1];

when you access arr[0][1] you are accessing beyond the end of the first array "row." Memory access in C is not checked, so your access aliases the element stored at arr[1][0].

If you swapped the order of the two assignment statements, you would see that the value displayed depends on the order of those two assignments. The later assignment writes over the value from the earlier assignment. I.e.:

int main ()
{
    int arr[10][1];
    arr[0][1]=55;
    arr[1][0]=44;
    printf("%i",arr[1][0]);
    return 0;
}

...would print 44, simply because that would be the final value written to that int-sized spot in memory.

EDIT: Because we have so many people commenting here, claiming to interpret the lousy C99 standard as declaring the behavior you have invoked as "undefined behavior"... Consider that the following code does the same thing as above, due to section 6.5.2.1:

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int arr[10][1];

    arr[1][0] = 44;
    arr[0][1] = 55;

    printf("Value is: %d\n", 0[arr][1]);

    return 0;
}

In a linked question, the claim has been made that the C compiler may choose to pad the space between array "rows" due to alignment concerns. That is disinformation; no C standard says that is possible.

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Thank you very much for pointing out the obvious. I know that if i declare it as [10][2] there will be no problem. but why does the program assign 55 to arr[1][0] is beyond me... –  Ancc May 6 '11 at 21:46
    
Ok. After a little thinking i can understand it now. Thank you for your time. –  Ancc May 6 '11 at 21:50
    
I'm sorry you thought that was "obvious" -- you didn't make it clear in your question that you knew this. I guess the step you're missing is that all the array elements are stored contiguously in memory, so that arr[1][0] is immediately after arr[0][0] and writing arr[0][1] means the same things as "the int immediately after arr[0][1]". I'm not sure how to help you more -- this stuff about pointers, aliasing and arrays is sort of the basics of C. Maybe go back and read the original K&R? It's actually really good. –  Heath Hunnicutt May 6 '11 at 21:54
    
No the step i am missing is the 8 hours sleep i should have had. I'm sorry if i offended you in anyway. Thank you again for the answer. –  Ancc May 6 '11 at 21:58
1  
arr is an array, but arr[0] through arr[9] are 10 arrays of one element each. arr[0] in particular, is a one-element array, so you can't do arr[0][1] any more than you can do int a[1]; a[1] = 42;. The fact that arr[1][0] occupies the same memory as arr[0][1] doesn't matter to the standard: arr[0][1] is UB. –  Alok Singhal May 7 '11 at 1:47

No they are not the same. You declared an array of ten arrays each with a single integer element. arr[0][1] is greater than your array index so should be an error. The result should be 44.

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1  
Yet the result comes out as 55. Why would that be? –  Ancc May 6 '11 at 21:38
1  
@Anc - Because arr[0][1] is illegal. You've declared your array as int arr[10][1], which means it has 10 columns and 1 row. Then arr[0][1] tries to access the second row of the first column, which doesn't exist, so it does crazy things. –  Chris Lutz May 6 '11 at 21:41
    
@Chris -- It's not illegal. It just isn't what OP expected. –  Heath Hunnicutt May 6 '11 at 21:43
1  
@Chris Lutz: undefined means undefined; the compiler is under no requirement to reject the code or cause an error to be signaled in the binary. Any result is possible, and as far as the standard is concerned, equally correct. –  John Bode May 6 '11 at 21:47
1  
@Chris, @John -- Show me where any C standard indicates this behavior is undefined. In fact, ISO 9899:TC2, Section 6.5.2.1 defines how this will behave. I understand that any access beyond the storage defined for the array would surely invoke undefined behavior. But I believe what you are saying about array indices, pointer access, etc., is simply not correct. The access in question is within the defined space, just accessed in an odd way. –  Heath Hunnicutt May 6 '11 at 22:04

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