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I am making a simple dice roller, which seems like a good first project to me, and may help others learn javascript as well, and when you roll a die (with a button), it is supposed to add to the total (there is a clear button), but it says NaN. Here is my code:

<html>
<body>
<script type="text/javascript">
function load()
{
document.getElementById("press").value=" "
var x=0
}
function d6()
{
var x=x+(Math.floor((Math.random() * 6) + 1));
document.getElementById("press").value=(x)
}
load()
</script>
<input type="button" value="Roll d6" onclick="d6()"/>
<input type="text" id="press"/>
</b>
<input type="button" value="Clear" onclick="load()"/>
</body>
</html>

Help would be greatly appriciated. Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
morgan w-k rather than delete leave it for others to find, They may have the same problem –  John Nolan May 6 '11 at 22:06
    
If you have a solution, you can add an answer showing how to benefit other users who might have the same problem. Deleting the question when you figure it out yourself is not how StackOverflow works. –  adrianbanks May 6 '11 at 22:06

3 Answers 3

This is happenning because variable x is not initialised when you are using it in d6(). The scope of the 2 functions is different.

You need x to be a global variable. For that, use the following code structure:

x = 0
function load() { ... }
function d6() { ... } 

Remember that when you declare a variable with the keyword 'var' preceding it, the variable is considered local. A variable without a 'var' is considered global.

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Your x variables are local to the functions. change x to be a global variable:

var x;
function load() { ... }
function d6() { ... }
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When using JavaScript it is important to consider the scope of names and values. Consider the difference between this:

var x = 2;
function assignX(v) {
    x = v;
}
print(x); // 2 
assignX(3);
print(x); // 3

and this:

function assignX(v) {
    var x = v;
}
print(x); // undefined
assignX(3);
print(x); // undefined

In the first example x exists in the global scope which encloses all names and values. In the second example x only exists within the function assignX.

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