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I'm trying to use the Apache/Jakarta HttpClient 4.1.1 to connect to an arbitrary web page using the given credentials. To test this, I have a minimal install of IIS 7.5 on my dev machine running where only one authentication mode is active at a time. Basic authentication works fine, but Digest and NTLM return 401 error messages whenever I try to log in. Here is my code:

    DefaultHttpClient httpclient = new DefaultHttpClient();
    HttpContext localContext = new BasicHttpContext();
    HttpGet httpget = new HttpGet("http://localhost/"); 
    CredentialsProvider credsProvider = new BasicCredentialsProvider();
    credsProvider.setCredentials(AuthScope.ANY,
            new NTCredentials("user", "password", "", "localhost"));
    if (!new File(System.getenv("windir") + "\\krb5.ini").exists()) {
        List<String> authtypes = new ArrayList<String>();
        authtypes.add(AuthPolicy.NTLM);
        authtypes.add(AuthPolicy.DIGEST);
        authtypes.add(AuthPolicy.BASIC);
        httpclient.getParams().setParameter(AuthPNames.PROXY_AUTH_PREF,
                authtypes);
        httpclient.getParams().setParameter(AuthPNames.TARGET_AUTH_PREF,
                authtypes);
    }
    localContext.setAttribute(ClientContext.CREDS_PROVIDER, credsProvider);
    HttpResponse response = httpclient.execute(httpget, localContext);
    System.out.println("Response code: " + response.getStatusLine());

The one thing I've noticed in Fiddler is that the hashes sent by Firefox versus by HttpClient are different, making me think that maybe IIS 7.5 is expecting stronger hashing than HttpClient provides? Any ideas? It'd be great if I could verify that this would work with NTLM. Digest would be nice too, but I can live without that if necessary.

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I got Digest authentication to work in browsers, but it still shows 401 forbidden in HttpClient. I'm stumped. –  Jesse May 10 '11 at 20:21

5 Answers 5

The easiest way troubleshoot such situations I found is Wireshark. It is a very big hammer, but it really will show you everything. Install it, make sure your server is on another machine (does not work with Localhost) and start logging.

Run your request that fails, run one that works. Then, filter by http (just put http in the filter field), find the first GET request, find the other GET request and compare. Identify meaningful difference, you now have specific keywords or issues to search code/net for. If not enough, narrow down to first TCP conversation and look at full request/response. Same with the other one.

I solved an unbelievable number of problems with that approach. And Wireshark is very useful tool to know. Lots of super-advanced functions to make your network debugging easier.

You can also run it on either client or server end. Whatever will show you both requests to allow you to compare.

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I had a similar problem with HttpClient 4.1.2. For me, it was resolved by reverting to HttpClient 4.0.3. I could never get NTLM working with 4.1.2 using either the built-in implementation or using JCIFS.

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Just a note, I ran into this same problem as well. The httpclient 4.2.3 release claims to have a refreshed NTLM implementation. I found that upgrading to 4.2.3 worked flawlessly with regards to NTLM. –  Peter Mularien Jan 30 '13 at 15:06

I am not an expert on the subject but during the NTLM authentication using http components i have seen that the client needs 3 attempts in order to connect to an NTML endpoing in my case. It is kinda described here for Spnego but it is a bit different for the NTLM authentication.

For NTLM in the first attempt client will make a request with Target auth state: UNCHALLENGED and Web server returns HTTP 401 status and a header: WWW-Authenticate: NTLM

Client will check for the configured Authentication schemes, NTLM should be configured in client code.

Second attempt, client will make a request with Target auth state: CHALLENGED, and will send an authorization header with a token encoded in base64 format: Authorization: NTLM TlRMTVNTUAABAAAAAYIIogAAAAAoAAAAAAAAACgAAAAFASgKAAAADw== Server again returns HTTP 401 status but the header: WWW-Authenticate: NTLM now is populated with encoded information.

3rd Attempt Client will use the informaton from WWW-Authenticate: NTLM header and will make the final request with Target auth state: HANDSHAKE and an authorisaton header Authorization: NTLM which contains more information for the server.

In my case i receive an HTTP/1.1 200 OK after that.

In order to avoid all this in every request documentation at chapter 4.7.1 states that the same execution token must be used for logically related requests. For me it did not worked.

My code: I initialize the client once in a @PostConstruct method of an EJB

        PoolingHttpClientConnectionManager cm = new PoolingHttpClientConnectionManager();
        cm.setMaxTotal(18);
        cm.setDefaultMaxPerRoute(6);

        RequestConfig requestConfig = RequestConfig.custom()
        .setSocketTimeout(30000)
        .setConnectTimeout(30000)
        .setTargetPreferredAuthSchemes(Arrays.asList(AuthSchemes.NTLM))
        .setProxyPreferredAuthSchemes(Arrays.asList(AuthSchemes.BASIC))
        .build();

        CredentialsProvider credentialsProvider = new BasicCredentialsProvider();
        credentialsProvider.setCredentials(AuthScope.ANY,
                new NTCredentials(userName, password, hostName, domainName));

        // Finally we instantiate the client. Client is a thread safe object and can be used by several threads at the same time. 
        // Client can be used for several request. The life span of the client must be equal to the life span of this EJB.
         this.httpclient = HttpClients.custom()
        .setConnectionManager(cm)
        .setDefaultCredentialsProvider(credentialsProvider)
        .setDefaultRequestConfig(requestConfig)
        .build();

Use the same client instance in every request:

            HttpPost httppost = new HttpPost(endPoint.trim());            
            // HttpClientContext is not thread safe, one per request must be created.
            HttpClientContext context = HttpClientContext.create();    
            response = this.httpclient.execute(httppost, context);

Dealocate the resources and return the connection back to connection manager, at the @PreDestroy method of my EJB:

             this.httpclient.close();
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I finally figured it out. Digest authentication requires that if you use a full URL in the request, the proxy also needs to use the full URL. I did not leave the proxy code in the sample, but it was directed to "localhost", which caused it to fail. Changing this to 127.0.0.1 made it work.

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I had the same problem with HttpClient4.1.X After upgrading it to HttpClient 4.2.6 it woked like charm. Below is my code

DefaultHttpClient httpclient = new DefaultHttpClient();
        HttpContext localContext = new BasicHttpContext();
        HttpGet httpget = new HttpGet("url"); 
        CredentialsProvider credsProvider = new BasicCredentialsProvider();
        credsProvider.setCredentials(AuthScope.ANY,
                new NTCredentials("username", "pwd", "", "domain"));
                    List<String> authtypes = new ArrayList<String>();
            authtypes.add(AuthPolicy.NTLM);      
            httpclient.getParams().setParameter(AuthPNames.TARGET_AUTH_PREF,authtypes);

        localContext.setAttribute(ClientContext.CREDS_PROVIDER, credsProvider);
        HttpResponse response = httpclient.execute(httpget, localContext);
        HttpEntity entity=response.getEntity();
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