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I find this really strange..could someone give an explanation?

abstract class UIController{
   public static function exec($context,$vdo){
      return call_user_func(array($context, $vdo));   
   }
}

class UIControllerSettings extends UIController{
    protected function save(){
        return "saved\n";
    }
}

$controller = new UIControllerSettings();
echo UIController::exec($controller, 'save'); //<-- prints "saved"
echo $controller->save(); // <-- throws a fatal error 

Not sure it this makes sense; shouldn't both calls produce a fatal error??

Thanks in advance.

Update:

Here is the output:

$ php --version
PHP 5.3.3-1ubuntu9.5 with Suhosin-Patch (cli) (built: May  3 2011 00:48:48) 
Copyright (c) 1997-2009 The PHP Group
Zend Engine v2.3.0, Copyright (c) 1998-2010 Zend Technologies
$ php test.php 
saved
PHP Fatal error:  Call to protected method UIControllerSettings::save() from context '' in test.php on line 17
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The first one doesnt cause an error, but it isnt "okay". As far as I can see it should output "saved", but I tried it myself and it returned nothing. –  KingCrunch May 6 '11 at 22:52
    
What is the error that you're getting? –  Demian Brecht May 6 '11 at 22:52
    
@Demian: Fatal, its mentioned at the source. However, the line above the failing one should fail too (also mentioned in the question). –  KingCrunch May 6 '11 at 22:53
2  
Class members declared public can be accessed everywhere. Members declared protected can be accessed only within the class itself and by inherited and parent classes: php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.visibility.php. Since UIController::exec() is the right way to address the public static function, my guess is the call_use_func() is being processed as a call from within the class itself. On the other hand $controler->save() can't be run because it's a protected function. –  PENDO May 6 '11 at 22:56
1  
PENDO, please make your comment an answer. –  webbiedave May 6 '11 at 23:01
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Class members declared public can be accessed everywhere. Members declared protected can be accessed only within the class itself and by inherited and parent classes:

http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.visibility.php.

Since UIController::exec() is the right way to address the public static function, my guess is the call_use_func() is being processed as a call from within the class itself. On the other hand $controler->save() can't be run because it's a protected function.

share|improve this answer
    
I see your point; that's probably it. But isn't this a bug? I'm not just calling the protected method from inside the UIController class. The UIController::exec() method calls a protected method of the object $context, which just happens to be a instance of the child class UIControllerSettings. Looks more like a bug to me :-/ –  dimi May 6 '11 at 23:21
    
It's normal behaviour. Your exec() function is doing the work by calling call_user_func() which in it's turn is calling the save() function. Because exec() is a method of UIController everything within this method has enough privileges to run private functions/alter private variables and so on. –  PENDO May 6 '11 at 23:43
add comment

Protected methods can be called anywhere in the inheritance line of the object(parents and children). Because UIController::exec which is in UIController that is a parent of UIControllerSettings is actually calling UIControllerSettings::save and not the main code it is perfectly ok.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your reply, but I'm not sure it's entirely correct (could be). I'm not just calling the protected method from inside the UIController class. The UIController::exec() method calls a protected method of the object $context, which just happens to be a instance of the child class UIControllerSettings –  dimi May 6 '11 at 23:25
1  
If you try to call a protected method of any other class it will fail. it works just because its in the same inheritance line. –  Dani May 6 '11 at 23:26
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