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I have these two arrays. I want array b to be merged into array 1 and apples show under product[0], oranges in product[1] and lemon in product[2]:

$a = Array
(
    [0] => Array
    (
        [Customer] => Array
        (
            [id] => 46714
        )
        [Product] => Array
        (
            [id] => 148  
        )
    )       
    [1] => Array
    (
        [Customer] => Array
        (
            [id] => 46714              
        )
        [Product] => Array
        (
            [id] => 148
        )   
    )
    [2] => Array
    (
        [Customer] => Array
        (
            [id] => 46714                           
        )
        [Product] => Array
        (
            [id] => 148  
        )
    )
)

$b = array(     
    [0] => apples
    [1] => Orange
    [2] => Lemon
)
share|improve this question
    
Or have you just forgotten to show array $b and therefore made the question impossible to answer? –  Orbling May 6 '11 at 22:59
    
sorry just added array b –  Autolycus May 6 '11 at 23:00
1  
Show in the product how? Replacing it, another field next to ID (if so, called what)? –  Orbling May 6 '11 at 23:04
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Something like?

foreach ($b as $key => $value)
{
  $a[$key]['product'][] = $value;  
}

You need to specify your desired result for a more accurate guess.

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2  
hmm, using $k in my example would be easier yes, haha :-) –  Joshua - Pendo May 6 '11 at 23:05
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foreach($b as $key => $value) {
  $a[$key]['fruit'] = $value;
}

That would add them based on the current order. Giving you $a[0]['fruit'] = Apples, $a[1]['fruit'] = Orange and $a[2]['fruit'] = "Lemon". I'm not sure if that's what you need, can't completely understand your question.

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$k would equal $i in this case, and has to, potentially skipping values, so I would dispense with $i entirely. I would upvote this, but not with single letter variables, using the ['fruit'] key is actually better than the other answer however. –  Orbling May 6 '11 at 23:06
    
yeah, I noticed jeroen's post with the $k part. I've changed the code with your notes. –  Joshua - Pendo May 6 '11 at 23:09
    
That's better. :-) –  Orbling May 6 '11 at 23:09
    
@Orbling, @PENDO I kind of agree, but in the end this is a guessing game; without information about the desired result we can add keys, name keys, put them under product, next to product, etc. –  jeroen May 6 '11 at 23:13
1  
I agree, but just to keep a relation to the values he's trying to add fruit makes it a little bit more clear. You were right on the $key part tho, completely missed it. Just wondering if both arrays are always of the same lengt.. but with the information given this is the best we can do I guess. –  Joshua - Pendo May 6 '11 at 23:14
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You could follow the other examples, but you could spare yourself an unneeded iteration by modifying your $b array and merging the two:

// Modify your $b array to mimic the structure of your $a array
$b = array(     
    [0] => array('Product' => 'apples'),
    [1] => array('Product' => 'Orange'),
    [2] => array('Product' => 'Lemon')
);

// Merge the two arrays into $a
$a = array_merge($a, $b);

Generally it's best to use PHP's compiled code as it will out perform any code you can write yourself.

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