Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In ruby, when one defines a method in the root scope, it can be called from that scope:

def foo
  "foo"
end
foo #=> "foo"

In any other context this is not the case:

class Bar
  def foo
    "foo"
  end
  foo #=> Error: No Method `foo` for class Bar
end

What mechanism is used in setting up the main object (an instance of Object) that allows this to happen?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is really special cased in Ruby. If you define methods in the global scope they get actually defined on Kernel which is included in every object by default.

Kernel is also there when no other context is defined. Since Class inherits also from Kernel methods defined on it are also in scope in class scopes.

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't know that before - I'll think twice before writing such a method again! –  Andrew Grimm May 8 '11 at 23:20

Just to confirm what Jakub Hampl said:

def foo
  "Debugging: self is #{self.inspect}"
end
foo # => "Debugging: self is main"

class Bar
  def goo
    foo
  end
end

Bar.new.goo # => "Debugging: self is #<Bar:0x1513cc0>"
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Good way to demonstrate. Maybe also print superclasses? –  Jakub Hampl May 8 '11 at 23:37

You should define it as a class method (self) instead of instance method

class Bar
  def self.foo
    "foo"
  end
  foo 
  #=> "foo"
end
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.