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I should know this already but... printf is to sprintf as cout is to ____? Please give an example.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

It sounds like you are looking for std::ostringstream.

Of course C++ streams don't use format-specifiers like C's printf()-type functions; they use manipulators.

Example, as requested:

#include <sstream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <cassert>

std::string stringify(double x, size_t precision)
{
    std::ostringstream o;
    o << std::fixed << std::setprecision(precision) << x;
    return o.str();
}

int main()
{
    assert(stringify(42.0, 6) == "42.000000");
    return 0;
}
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1  
C++ streams can handle format specifiers, with appropriate help. See Boost.Format‌​. –  Robᵩ May 7 '11 at 0:03
    
@Rob: The "appropriate help" is important. They do not out-of-the-box. –  Johnsyweb May 7 '11 at 0:09
#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    ostringstream s;
    s.precision(3);
    s << "pi = " << fixed << 3.141592;
    cout << s.str() << endl;
    return 0;
}

Output:

pi = 3.142
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Here's an example:

#include <sstream>

int main()
{
    std::stringstream sout;
    sout << "Hello " << 10 << "\n";

    const std::string s = sout.str();
    std::cout << s;
    return 0;
}

If you want to clear the stream for reuse, you can do

sout.str(std::string());

Also look at the Boost Format library.

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 std::ostringstream

You can use this to create something like the Boost lexical cast:

#include <sstream>
#include <string>

template <typename T>
std::string ToString( const T & t ) {
    std::ostringstream os;
    os << t;
    return os.str();
}

In use:

string is = ToString( 42 );      // is contains "42"
string fs = ToString( 1.23 ) ;   // fs contains something approximating "1.23"
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6  
You could at least provide a link to the reference page when trying to defeat the 30 character limit. –  Tim May 6 '11 at 23:51
    
@Tim I'm under no obligation to provide anything here, particularly when as the OP says he should know it already. Think of my answer as a reminder. –  nbt May 6 '11 at 23:53
3  
The limit is there to encourage you to write something intelligent, not to evade it with useless bumf. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 6 '11 at 23:59

You have a little misunderstanding for the concept of cout. cout is a stream and the operator << is defined for any stream. So, you just need another stream that writes to string in order to output your data. You can use a standard stream like std::ostringstream or define your own one.

So your analogy is not very precise, since cout is not a function like printf and sprintf

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1  
He didn't ask for a function; he used an analogy. –  Tim May 6 '11 at 23:52
1  
+1 rather than coming up with a doubtful answer that doesn't really fit (how is "ostringstream" an object like "cout"? printf and sprintf are both functions), this answer explains the mistake in the analogy the questioner tried to make up! EDIT: Sadly, he removed his notes on the flaw in the analogy. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 6 '11 at 23:55

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