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What rules or tips should I follow to enable a function to use NRV (named return value) optimization in a function? I assimilated these tips from different places, but don't know if it my understanding is correct:

  1. the object to be returned should not have any name inside the function (then why is it called NAMED return value optimization!!)
  2. return statement should have object surrounded by parenthesis
  3. object to be returned should have explicit and inline copy constructor
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I answered you about 1 (which seems to be the main point), but I didn't really understand 2, and I'm not sure about 3, but I don't think the compiler cares about the copy constructor being inline and defined explicitly (it probably shouldn't have the explicit keyword though, since it would needed to be called implicitly if no optimization happens). –  Boaz Yaniv May 7 '11 at 0:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you mean NRVO (Named Return Value Optimization) as opposed to RVO (Return Value Optimization), then the object has to be named inside the function. Otherwise it would only be eligible to RVO, not NRVO. So there's a pretty good reason for calling it Named Return Value Optimization.

Check out the following examples:

RVO:

BigObject foo(int x, int y)
{
    // Returned BigObject is created ad-hoc, and has no local 'name'.
    return BigObject(x, y);
}

void bar()
{
    BigObject obj = foo(4, 6);
}

Would be translated by an optimizing compiler to this pseudo-code:

void foo(int x, int y, BigObject& ret)
{
    ret._constructor_(x, y);
}

void bar()
{
    BigObject obj; // Allocate obj on the stack, but don't construct it just yet!
    foo(4, 6, obj); // Now obj is constructed by foo()
}

NRVO:

BigObject foo(int x, int y, int z)
{
    // Returned BigObject has a local 'name' in foo(), which is obj.
    BigObject obj(x, y);

    // Do something with obj
    obj.setZ(z);

    return obj;
}

void bar()
{
    BigObject obj = foo(4, 6, 7);
}

Would be translated by an optimizing compiler to this pseudo-code:

void foo(int x, int y, int z, BigObject& ret)
{
    ret._constructor_(x, y);

    // Do something with ret
    ret.setZ(z);
}

void bar()
{
    BigObject obj; // Allocate obj on the stack, but don't construct it just yet!
    foo(4, 6, 7, obj); // Now obj is constructed by foo()
}

Note that whether the optimization actually occurs depends a lot on the compiler. Some compilers (like very old compilers) won't do RVO or NRVO at all, while other compilers may have different constraints on this optimization. Here's a description of the constraints MSVC puts on NRVO: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms364057(v=vs.80).aspx#nrvo_cpp05_topic3

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aaah! i mistaknely thought RVO is short form of NRVO –  paseena May 7 '11 at 1:00
    
so rvo done by user and nrvo by compiler? –  paseena May 7 '11 at 1:02
    
No. Both are done by the compiler, and the user can't control them at all. NRVO is done when the object has a 'local name' in the returning function, and RVO is done when it's created on the same line as the return statement. –  Boaz Yaniv May 7 '11 at 1:03

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