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I am lost in a big database and I am not able to find where the data I get comes from. I was wondering if it is possible with SQL Server 2005 to search for a string in an all the tables, rows and columns of a DB?

Does anybody has an idea if it is possible and how?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
See this as well,,, stackoverflow.com/questions/13174627/… –  zzzz May 30 at 5:17

12 Answers 12

up vote 38 down vote accepted

This code should do it in SQL 2005, but a few caveats:

  1. It assumes that all objects are owned by dbo. If that's not the case you'll need to adjust it.

  2. It is RIDICULOUSLY slow. I tested it on a small database that I have with only a handful of tables and it took many minutes to complete. If your database is so big that you can't understand it then this will probably be unusable anyway.

  3. I wrote this off the cuff. I didn't put in any error handling and there might be some other sloppiness especially since I don't use cursors often. For example, I think there's a way to refresh the columns cursor instead of closing/deallocating/recreating it every time.

If you can't understand the database or don't know where stuff is coming from, then you should probably find someone who does. Even if you can find where the data is, it might be duplicated somewhere or there might be other aspects of the database that you don't understand. If no one in your company understands the database then you're in a pretty big mess.

DECLARE
    @search_string  VARCHAR(100),
    @table_name     SYSNAME,
    @table_id       INT,
    @column_name    SYSNAME,
    @sql_string     VARCHAR(2000)

SET @search_string = 'Test'

DECLARE tables_cur CURSOR FOR SELECT name, object_id FROM sys.objects WHERE type = 'U'

OPEN tables_cur

FETCH NEXT FROM tables_cur INTO @table_name, @table_id

WHILE (@@FETCH_STATUS = 0)
BEGIN
    DECLARE columns_cur CURSOR FOR SELECT name FROM sys.columns WHERE object_id = @table_id AND system_type_id IN (167, 175, 231, 239)

    OPEN columns_cur

    FETCH NEXT FROM columns_cur INTO @column_name
    WHILE (@@FETCH_STATUS = 0)
    BEGIN
        SET @sql_string = 'IF EXISTS (SELECT * FROM ' + @table_name + ' WHERE [' + @column_name + '] LIKE ''%' + @search_string + '%'') PRINT ''' + @table_name + ', ' + @column_name + ''''

        EXECUTE(@sql_string)

        FETCH NEXT FROM columns_cur INTO @column_name
    END

    CLOSE columns_cur

    DEALLOCATE columns_cur

    FETCH NEXT FROM tables_cur INTO @table_name, @table_id
END

CLOSE tables_cur

DEALLOCATE tables_cur
share|improve this answer
    
"If no one in your company understands the database then you're in a pretty big mess" - yes, this is typically when the probably new and only IT person needs something like this, as management will not approve funds for doing it properly. PS. this worked ok for me on SQL server 2012. –  BeowulfNode42 Aug 7 at 7:11

I’d suggest you find yourself a 3rd party tool for this such as ApexSQL Search (there are probably others out there too but I use this one because it’s free).

If you really want to go the SQL way you can try using stored procedure created by Sorna Kumar Muthuraj – copied code is below. Just execute this stored procedure for all tables in your schema (easy with dynamics SQL)

CREATE PROCEDURE SearchTables 
 @Tablenames VARCHAR(500) 
,@SearchStr NVARCHAR(60) 
,@GenerateSQLOnly Bit = 0 
AS 

/* 
    Parameters and usage 

    @Tablenames        -- Provide a single table name or multiple table name with comma seperated.  
                        If left blank , it will check for all the tables in the database 
    @SearchStr        -- Provide the search string. Use the '%' to coin the search.  
                        EX : X%--- will give data staring with X 
                             %X--- will give data ending with X 
                             %X%--- will give data containig  X 
    @GenerateSQLOnly -- Provide 1 if you only want to generate the SQL statements without seraching the database.  
                        By default it is 0 and it will search. 

    Samples : 

    1. To search data in a table 

        EXEC SearchTables @Tablenames = 'T1' 
                         ,@SearchStr  = '%TEST%' 

        The above sample searches in table T1 with string containing TEST. 

    2. To search in a multiple table 

        EXEC SearchTables @Tablenames = 'T2' 
                         ,@SearchStr  = '%TEST%' 

        The above sample searches in tables T1 & T2 with string containing TEST. 

    3. To search in a all table 

        EXEC SearchTables @Tablenames = '%' 
                         ,@SearchStr  = '%TEST%' 

        The above sample searches in all table with string containing TEST. 

    4. Generate the SQL for the Select statements 

        EXEC SearchTables @Tablenames        = 'T1' 
                         ,@SearchStr        = '%TEST%' 
                         ,@GenerateSQLOnly    = 1 

*/ 

    SET NOCOUNT ON 

    DECLARE @CheckTableNames Table 
    ( 
    Tablename sysname 
    ) 

    DECLARE @SQLTbl TABLE 
    ( 
     Tablename        SYSNAME 
    ,WHEREClause    VARCHAR(MAX) 
    ,SQLStatement   VARCHAR(MAX) 
    ,Execstatus        BIT  
    ) 

    DECLARE @sql VARCHAR(MAX) 
    DECLARE @tmpTblname sysname 

    IF LTRIM(RTRIM(@Tablenames)) IN ('' ,'%') 
    BEGIN 

        INSERT INTO @CheckTableNames 
        SELECT Name 
          FROM sys.tables 
    END 
    ELSE 
    BEGIN 

        SELECT @sql = 'SELECT ''' + REPLACE(@Tablenames,',',''' UNION SELECT ''') + '''' 

        INSERT INTO @CheckTableNames 
        EXEC(@sql) 

    END 

    INSERT INTO @SQLTbl 
    ( Tablename,WHEREClause) 
    SELECT SCh.name + '.' + ST.NAME, 
            ( 
                SELECT '[' + SC.name + ']' + ' LIKE ''' + @SearchStr + ''' OR ' + CHAR(10) 
                  FROM SYS.columns SC 
                  JOIN SYS.types STy 
                    ON STy.system_type_id = SC.system_type_id 
                   AND STy.user_type_id =SC.user_type_id 
                 WHERE STY.name in ('varchar','char','nvarchar','nchar') 
                   AND SC.object_id = ST.object_id 
                 ORDER BY SC.name 
                FOR XML PATH('') 
            ) 
      FROM  SYS.tables ST 
      JOIN @CheckTableNames chktbls 
                ON chktbls.Tablename = ST.name  
      JOIN SYS.schemas SCh 
        ON ST.schema_id = SCh.schema_id 
     WHERE ST.name <> 'SearchTMP' 
      GROUP BY ST.object_id, SCh.name + '.' + ST.NAME ; 

      UPDATE @SQLTbl 
         SET SQLStatement = 'SELECT * INTO SearchTMP FROM ' + Tablename + ' WHERE ' + substring(WHEREClause,1,len(WHEREClause)-5) 

      DELETE FROM @SQLTbl 
       WHERE WHEREClause IS NULL 

    WHILE EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM @SQLTbl WHERE ISNULL(Execstatus ,0) = 0) 
    BEGIN 

        SELECT TOP 1 @tmpTblname = Tablename , @sql = SQLStatement 
          FROM @SQLTbl  
         WHERE ISNULL(Execstatus ,0) = 0 



         IF @GenerateSQLOnly = 0 
         BEGIN 

            IF OBJECT_ID('SearchTMP','U') IS NOT NULL 
                DROP TABLE SearchTMP 
            EXEC (@SQL) 

            IF EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM SearchTMP) 
            BEGIN 
                SELECT Tablename=@tmpTblname,* FROM SearchTMP 
            END 

         END 
         ELSE 
         BEGIN 
             PRINT REPLICATE('-',100) 
             PRINT @tmpTblname 
             PRINT REPLICATE('-',100) 
             PRINT replace(@sql,'INTO SearchTMP','') 
         END 

         UPDATE @SQLTbl 
            SET Execstatus = 1 
          WHERE Tablename = @tmpTblname 

    END 

    SET NOCOUNT OFF 

go
share|improve this answer
    
This stored proc is way more efficient than some of the other suggestions as it checks all the columns of a row in one select statement, but will not necessarily give you which cell the column matched. It also doesn't not presume that you want a full %wildcard% search. It also doesn't create any temporary tables, which is a hassle if not checked before before running the code. If you aren't supposed to modify the db in which you're searching, simply convert the whole thing into a BEGIN / DECLARE / END block and keep it saved somewhere handy. –  Mayyit Apr 6 at 12:23
    
One more suggestion to users -- if the result set might be particularly large, and you just want to "start out" to see where things are, modify the above to include "TOP 100" limits or so. –  Mayyit Apr 6 at 12:33
    
I take my words back about it not creating temp tables .. it's a bit worse than that, even! A table, "SearchTMP", is created. –  Mayyit Apr 6 at 13:01

If you are "getting data" from an application, the sensible thing would be to use the profiler and profile the database while running the application. Trace it, then search the results for that string.

share|improve this answer
    
You have a point here! –  mvaraujo Feb 12 at 5:09

Although the solutions presented before are valid and work, I humbly offer a code that's cleaner, more elegant, and with better performance, at least as I see it.

Firstly, one may ask: Why would anyone ever need a code snippet to globally and blindly look for a string? Hey, they already invented fulltext, don't you know?

My answer: my mainly work is at systems integration projects, and discovering where the data is written is important whenever I'm learning a new and undocummented database, which seldom happens.

Also, the code I present is a stripped down version of a more powerful and dangerous script that searches and REPLACES text throughout the database.

CREATE TABLE #result(
  id      INT IDENTITY, -- just for register seek order
  tblName VARCHAR(255),
  colName VARCHAR(255),
  qtRows  INT
)
go

DECLARE @toLookFor VARCHAR(255)
SET @toLookFor = '[input your search criteria here]'

DECLARE cCursor CURSOR LOCAL FAST_FORWARD FOR
SELECT
  '[' + usr.name + '].[' + tbl.name + ']' AS tblName,
  '[' + col.name + ']' AS colName,
  LOWER(typ.name) AS typName
FROM
  sysobjects tbl
    INNER JOIN(
      syscolumns col
        INNER JOIN systypes typ
        ON typ.xtype = col.xtype
    )
    ON col.id = tbl.id
    --
    LEFT OUTER JOIN sysusers usr
    ON usr.uid = tbl.uid

WHERE tbl.xtype = 'U'
  AND LOWER(typ.name) IN(
        'char', 'nchar',
        'varchar', 'nvarchar',
        'text', 'ntext'
      )
ORDER BY tbl.name, col.colorder
--
DECLARE @tblName VARCHAR(255)
DECLARE @colName VARCHAR(255)
DECLARE @typName VARCHAR(255)
--
DECLARE @sql  NVARCHAR(4000)
DECLARE @crlf CHAR(2)

SET @crlf = CHAR(13) + CHAR(10)

OPEN cCursor
FETCH cCursor
INTO @tblName, @colName, @typName

WHILE @@fetch_status = 0
BEGIN
  IF @typName IN('text', 'ntext')
  BEGIN
    SET @sql = ''
    SET @sql = @sql + 'INSERT INTO #result(tblName, colName, qtRows)' + @crlf
    SET @sql = @sql + 'SELECT @tblName, @colName, COUNT(*)' + @crlf
    SET @sql = @sql + 'FROM ' + @tblName + @crlf
    SET @sql = @sql + 'WHERE PATINDEX(''%'' + @toLookFor + ''%'', ' + @colName + ') > 0' + @crlf
  END
  ELSE
  BEGIN
    SET @sql = ''
    SET @sql = @sql + 'INSERT INTO #result(tblName, colName, qtRows)' + @crlf
    SET @sql = @sql + 'SELECT @tblName, @colName, COUNT(*)' + @crlf
    SET @sql = @sql + 'FROM ' + @tblName + @crlf
    SET @sql = @sql + 'WHERE ' + @colName + ' LIKE ''%'' + @toLookFor + ''%''' + @crlf
  END

  EXECUTE sp_executesql
            @sql,
            N'@tblName varchar(255), @colName varchar(255), @toLookFor varchar(255)',
            @tblName, @colName, @toLookFor

  FETCH cCursor
  INTO @tblName, @colName, @typName
END

SELECT *
FROM #result
WHERE qtRows > 0
ORDER BY id
GO

DROP TABLE #result
go
share|improve this answer

The SSMS Tools PACK Add-In (Add-On) for Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio and Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio Express will do exactly what you need. On larger database it takes some time to search, but that is to be expected. It also includes a ton of cool features that should have be included with SQL Server Management Studio in the first place. Give it a try www.ssmstoolspack.com/

You do need to have SP2 for SQL Server Management Studio installed to run the tools.

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I adapted a script originally written by Narayana Vyas Kondreddi in 2002. I changed the where clause to check text/ntext fields as well, by using patindex rather than like. I also changed the results table slightly. Unreasonably, I changed variable names, and aligned as I prefer (no disrespect to Mr. Kondretti). The user may want to change the data types searched. I used a global table to allow querying mid-processing, but a permanent table might be a smarter way to go.

/* original script by Narayana Vyas Kondreddi, 2002 */
/* adapted by Oliver Holloway, 2009 */

/* these lines can be replaced by use of input parameter for a proc */
declare @search_string varchar(1000);
set @search_string = 'what.you.are.searching.for';

/* create results table */
create table ##string_locations (
  table_name varchar(1000),
  field_name varchar(1000),
  field_value varchar(8000)
)
;
/* special settings */
set nocount on
;
/* declare variables */
declare
  @table_name varchar(1000),
  @field_name varchar(1000)
;
/* variable settings */
set @table_name = ''
;
set @search_string = QUOTENAME('%' + @search_string + '%','''')
;
/* for each table */
while @table_name is not null
begin

  set @field_name = ''
  set @table_name = (
    select MIN(QUOTENAME(table_schema) + '.' + QUOTENAME(table_name))
    from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES
    where 
      table_type = 'BASE TABLE' and
      QUOTENAME(table_schema) + '.' + QUOTENAME(table_name) > @table_name and
      OBJECTPROPERTY(OBJECT_ID(QUOTENAME(table_schema) + '.' + QUOTENAME(table_name)), 'IsMSShipped') = 0
  )

  /* for each string-ish field */
  while (@table_name is not null) and (@field_name is not null)
  begin
    set @field_name = (
      select MIN(QUOTENAME(column_name))
      from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS
      where 
        table_schema    = PARSENAME(@table_name, 2) and
        table_name  = PARSENAME(@table_name, 1) and
        data_type in ('char', 'varchar', 'nchar', 'nvarchar', 'text', 'ntext') and
        QUOTENAME(column_name) > @field_name
    )

    /* search that field for the string supplied */
    if @field_name is not null
    begin
      insert into ##string_locations
      exec(
        'select ''' + @table_name + ''',''' + @field_name + ''',' + @field_name + 
        'from ' + @table_name + ' (nolock) ' +
        'where patindex(' + @search_string + ',' + @field_name + ') > 0'  /* patindex works with char & text */
      )
    end
    ;
  end
  ;
end
;

/* return results */
select table_name, field_name, field_value from ##string_locations (nolock)
;
/* drop temp table */
--drop table ##string_locations
;
share|improve this answer

Other answers posted already may work equally well or better, but I haven't used them. However, the following SQL I have used, and it really helped me out when I was trying to reverse-engineer a big system with a huge (and very unorganzied) SQL Server database.

This isn't my code. I wish I could credit the original author, but I can't find the link to the article anymore :(

Use 
go

declare @SearchChar varchar(8000)
Set @SearchChar =  -- Like 'A%', '11/11/2006'

declare @CMDMain varchar(8000), @CMDMainCount varchar(8000),@CMDJoin varchar(8000)
declare @ColumnName varchar(100),@TableName varchar(100)

declare dbTable cursor for 
SELECT 
Distinct b.Name as TableName
FROM 
sysobjects b
WHERE 
b.type='u' and b.Name  'dtproperties'
order by b.name
open dbTable
fetch next from dbTable into @TableName

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
BEGIN
declare db cursor for 
SELECT 
c.Name as ColumnName
FROM 
sysobjects b,
syscolumns c
WHERE 
C.id = b.id and
b.type='u' and b.Name = @TableName
order by b.name
open db
fetch next from db into @ColumnName
set @CMDMain = 'SELECT ' + char(39) + @TableName + char(39) + ' as TableName,'+ 
' ['+ @TableName + '].* FROM [' + @TableName + ']'+
' WHERE '
set @CMDMainCount = 'SELECT Count(*) FROM [' + @TableName + '] Where '
Set @CMDJoin = ''
WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
BEGIN
set @CMDJoin = @CMDJoin + 'Convert(varchar(5000),[' +@ColumnName + ']) like ' + char(39) + @SearchChar + char(39) + ' OR '

fetch next from db into @ColumnName
end
close db
deallocate db

Set @CMDMainCount = 'If ('+ @CMDMainCount + Left(@CMDJoin, len(@CMDJoin) - 3)+ ') > 0 Begin '
Set @CMDMain = @CMDMainCount + @CMDMain + Left(@CMDJoin, len(@CMDJoin) - 3)
Set @CMDMain = @CMDMain + ' End '

Print @CMDMain

exec (@CMDMain)
fetch next from dbTable into @TableName
end
close dbTable
deallocate dbTable
share|improve this answer
3  
RE: Link Maybe here sqlservercentral.com/scripts/SQLInsider+Scripts/31796 –  Martin Smith Jun 21 '10 at 22:04

@NLwino, yery good query with a few errors for keyword usage. I had to modify it a little to wrap the keywords with [ ] and also look char and ntext columns.

    DECLARE @searchstring  NVARCHAR(255)
    SET @searchstring = '%WDB1014%'

    DECLARE @sql NVARCHAR(max)

    SELECT @sql = STUFF((
      SELECT ' UNION ALL SELECT ''' + TABLE_NAME + ''' AS tbl, ''' + COLUMN_NAME + ''' AS col, [' + COLUMN_NAME + '] AS val' + 
        ' FROM ' + TABLE_SCHEMA + '.[' + TABLE_NAME + 
        '] WHERE [' + COLUMN_NAME + '] LIKE ''' + @searchstring + ''''
        FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS 
        WHERE DATA_TYPE in ('nvarchar', 'varchar', 'char', 'ntext')
                  FOR XML PATH('')
             ) ,1, 11, '')

    Exec (@sql)

I ran it on 2.5 GB database and it came back in 51 seconds

share|improve this answer
    
If this is an edit of @NLwino's post you should edit his post (when you have sufficient reputation) rather than posting a new answer. –  middaparka Aug 8 '13 at 17:11

Actually Im agree with MikeW (+1) it's better to use profiler for this case.

Anyway, if you really need to grab all (n)varchar columns in db and make a search. See below. I suppose to use INFORMATION_SCHEMA.Tables + dynamic SQL. The plain search:

DECLARE @SearchText VARCHAR(100) SET @SearchText = '12'
DECLARE @Tables TABLE(N INT, TableName VARCHAR(100), ColumnNamesCSV VARCHAR(2000), SQL VARCHAR(4000))
INSERT INTO @Tables (TableName, ColumnNamesCSV)
SELECT T.TABLE_NAME AS TableName, 
(SELECT C.Column_Name + ',' FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.Columns C WHERE T.TABLE_NAME = C.TABLE_NAME AND C.DATA_TYPE IN ('nvarchar','varchar') FOR XML PATH(''))
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.Tables T 
DELETE FROM @Tables WHERE ColumnNamesCSV IS NULL
INSERT INTO @Tables (N, TableName, ColumnNamesCSV)
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY TableName), TableName, ColumnNamesCSV  FROM @Tables
DELETE FROM @Tables WHERE N IS NULL
UPDATE @Tables SET ColumnNamesCSV = SUBSTRING(ColumnNamesCSV, 0, LEN(ColumnNamesCSV))
UPDATE @Tables SET SQL = 'SELECT * FROM ['+TableName+'] WHERE '''+@SearchText+''' IN ('+ColumnNamesCSV+')'
DECLARE @C INT, @I INT, @SQL VARCHAR(4000)
SELECT @I = 1, @C = COUNT(*) FROM @Tables
WHILE @I <= @C BEGIN
    SELECT @SQL = SQL FROM @Tables WHERE N = @I
    SET @I = @I+1
    EXEC(@SQL)
END

and one with LIKE clause:

DECLARE @SearchText VARCHAR(100) SET @SearchText = '12'
DECLARE @Tables TABLE(N INT, TableName VARCHAR(100), ColumnNamesCSVLike VARCHAR(2000), LIKESQL VARCHAR(4000))
INSERT INTO @Tables (TableName, ColumnNamesCSVLike)
SELECT T.TABLE_NAME AS TableName, 
(SELECT C.Column_Name + ' LIKE ''%'+@SearchText+'%'' OR ' FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.Columns C WHERE T.TABLE_NAME = C.TABLE_NAME AND C.DATA_TYPE IN ('nvarchar','varchar') FOR XML PATH(''))
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.Tables T 
DELETE FROM @Tables WHERE ColumnNamesCSVLike IS NULL
INSERT INTO @Tables (N, TableName, ColumnNamesCSVLike)
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY TableName), TableName, ColumnNamesCSVLike  FROM @Tables
DELETE FROM @Tables WHERE N IS NULL
UPDATE @Tables SET ColumnNamesCSVLike = SUBSTRING(ColumnNamesCSVLike, 0, LEN(ColumnNamesCSVLike)-2)
UPDATE @Tables SET LIKESQL = 'SELECT * FROM ['+TableName+'] WHERE '+ColumnNamesCSVLike
DECLARE @C INT, @I INT, @LIKESQL VARCHAR(4000)
SELECT @I = 1, @C = COUNT(*) FROM @Tables
WHILE @I <= @C BEGIN
SELECT @LIKESQL = LIKESQL FROM @Tables WHERE N = @I
    SET @I = @I +1
    EXEC(@LIKESQL)
END
share|improve this answer
/*
This procedure to find any string or dates  in tables

if search string is date formate should be yyyy-MM-dd
eg. 2011-07-05


*/

-- ================================================
-- Exec SearchInTables 'f6f56934-a5d4-4967-80a1-1a2223b9c7b1'

-- ================================================
SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO
-- =============================================
-- Author:      <Joshy,,Name>
-- Create date: <Create Date,,>
-- Description: <Description,,>
-- =============================================
alter PROCEDURE SearchInTables
@myValue nvarchar(1000)
AS
BEGIN
    -- SET NOCOUNT ON added to prevent extra result sets from
    -- interfering with SELECT statements.
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    -- Insert statements for procedure here
        Declare @searchsql nvarchar(max)
        Declare @table_name nvarchar(1000)
        Declare @Schema_name nvarchar(1000)
        DECLARE @ParmDefinition nvarchar(500)
        DECLARE @XMLIn nvarchar(max)
        SET @ParmDefinition = N'@XMLOut varchar(max) OUTPUT'

Select A.name,b.name from sys.tables A 
inner join sys.schemas B on A.schema_id=B.schema_id
where A.name like 'tbl_Tax_Sections' 


        DECLARE tables_cur CURSOR FOR 
                            Select A.name,b.name from sys.tables A 
                            inner join sys.schemas B on A.schema_id=B.schema_id
                            WHERE A.type = 'U'  
        OPEN tables_cur  
        FETCH NEXT FROM tables_cur INTO @table_name , @Schema_name 
            WHILE (@@FETCH_STATUS = 0) 
            begin
                set @searchsql ='Select @XMLOut=(SELECT PATINDEX(''%'+ @myValue+ '%'''
                set @searchsql =@searchsql  + ', (SELECT * FROM '+@Schema_name+'.'+@table_name+' FOR XML AUTO) ))'
                --print @searchsql 
                Exec sp_executesql @searchsql, @ParmDefinition, @XMLOut=@XMLIn OUTPUT
                --print @XMLIn 

                if @XMLIn <> 0 print @Schema_name+'.'+@table_name

                FETCH NEXT FROM tables_cur INTO @table_name , @Schema_name 

            end
        CLOSE tables_cur 
        deallocate tables_cur 
    Return
END
GO
share|improve this answer

I know this question is old, but I needed it and thought I share it here. This uses no cursors or anything like that, just one dynamic query.

Also note that this uses LIKE. Since that happened to be what I needed. It works for all schema's, all tables and only query's those columns that are NVARCHAR or VARCHAR even if they have UDDT.

DECLARE @searchstring  NVARCHAR(255)
SET @searchstring = '%searchstring%'

DECLARE @sql NVARCHAR(max)

SELECT @sql = STUFF((
    SELECT ' UNION ALL SELECT ''' + TABLE_NAME + ''' AS table, ''' + COLUMN_NAME + ''' AS column, ' + COLUMN_NAME + ' AS value' + 
    ' FROM ' + TABLE_SCHEMA + '.' + TABLE_NAME + 
    ' WHERE ' + COLUMN_NAME + ' LIKE ''' + @searchstring + ''''
    FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS 
    WHERE DATA_TYPE in ('nvarchar', 'varchar')
    FOR XML PATH('')
) ,1, 11, '')

exec (@sql)

The output gives you the table, column and value. Time to execute on a small database was ~3 seconds, had about 3000 results.

share|improve this answer
1  
When I run this I get the error: Incorrect syntax near the keyword 'table'. –  Recursieve Jul 2 '13 at 10:38

To "find where the data I get comes from", you can start SQL Profiler, start your report or application, and you will see all the queries issued against your database.

share|improve this answer

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