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If I throw a Javascript exception myself (eg, throw "AArrggg"), how can I get the stack trace (in Firebug or otherwise)? Right now I just get the message.

edit: As many people below have posted, it is possible to get a stack trace for a JavaScript exception but I want to get a stack trace for my exceptions. For example:

function foo() {
    bar(2);
}
function bar(n) {
    if (n < 2)
        throw "Oh no! 'n' is too small!"
    bar(n-1);
}

When foo is called, I want to get a stack trace which includes the calls to foo, bar, bar.

share|improve this question
    
Just google for javascript stack trace. You will get your answer! Here's one particularly interesting - helephant.com/2007/05/diy-javascript-stack-trace –  Chetan Sastry Feb 26 '09 at 18:46
1  
possible duplicate of Javascript exception stack trace –  ripper234 Feb 5 '12 at 14:54
5  
The answer should be "throw new Error('arrrgh');" see this nicely written page: devthought.com/2011/12/22/a-string-is-not-an-error –  elegant dice Dec 11 '12 at 6:17
1  
(2013) You can now get stack traces in Firebug on Firefox even if it's simply throw 'arrrgh';, and they seem the same as with throw new Error('arrrgh');. Chrome debugger still needs throw new Error('arrrgh'); as stated, however (but Chrome seems to give much more detailed traces). –  user568458 Aug 20 '13 at 12:52
1  
@ChetanSastry I googled for 'javascript stack trace' and this was the first result –  David Sykes Mar 20 at 13:23

12 Answers 12

up vote 106 down vote accepted
+100

A modified version of this snippet may somewhat help:

function stacktrace() { 
  function st2(f) {
    return !f ? [] : 
        st2(f.caller).concat([f.toString().split('(')[0].substring(9) + '(' + f.arguments.join(',') + ')']);
  }
  return st2(arguments.callee.caller);
}


EDIT :

A better (and simpler) solution as pointed out in the comments on the original question is to use the stack property of an Error object like so:

function stackTrace() {
    var err = new Error();
    return err.stack;
}

This will generate output like this:

DBX.Utils.stackTrace@http://localhost:49573/assets/js/scripts.js:44
DBX.Console.Debug@http://localhost:49573/assets/js/scripts.js:9
.success@http://localhost:49573/:462
x.Callbacks/c@http://localhost:49573/assets/js/jquery-1.10.2.min.js:4
x.Callbacks/p.fireWith@http://localhost:49573/assets/js/jquery-1.10.2.min.js:4
k@http://localhost:49573/assets/js/jquery-1.10.2.min.js:6
.send/r@http://localhost:49573/assets/js/jquery-1.10.2.min.js:6

Giving the name of the calling function along with the URL, its calling function, and so on.

share|improve this answer
    
This seems to be the most promising so far... Creating an 'Exception', so calling an exception would be: throw Exception('message'), where the Exception function would figure out what's on the stack. –  David Wolever Mar 11 '09 at 18:56
5  
I'm not sure why this isn't voted up more - the other answers didn't work that well for me. BTW, make sure not to treat arguments as an array (updated snippet here: gist.github.com/965603) –  ripper234 May 10 '11 at 23:25
1  
not working in chrome, tacktrace(): [Exception: TypeError: Object #<Object> has no method –  hetaoblog Jan 7 '13 at 1:51
3  
see comment on original question: you don't need custom code, just use "throw new Error('arrrgh')" –  Joshua Richardson May 29 '13 at 0:02
5  
Error.stack is undefined in IE, only works in chrome and Mozilla firefox –  Philipp Munin Nov 12 '13 at 23:08

Note that chromium/chrome (other browsers using V8) do have a convenient interface to get a stacktrace through a stack property on Error objects.

try {
   // Code throwing an exception
} catch(e) {
  console.log(e.stack);
}

It applies for the base exceptions as well as for the ones you throw yourself. (Considered that you use the Error class, which is anyway a good practice).

See details on V8 documentation

share|improve this answer
7  
Firefox supports the .stack property too. –  KennyTM Apr 3 '13 at 11:07
    
I wish I could upvote 100 times! Thank you Jocelyn. It really helped a lot –  mrsafraz Jul 11 '13 at 15:55

If you have firebug, there's a break on all errors option in the script tab. Once the script has hit your breakpoint, you can look at firebug's stack window: alt text

share|improve this answer
5  
Hrm, that doesn't seem to work. It stops me in a debugger on errors raised by Javascript (eg, undefined variable errors), but when I throw my own exceptions I still don't get anything but the "Uncaught exception" message. –  David Wolever Mar 2 '09 at 13:37

In Firefox it seems that you don't need to throw the exception. It's sufficient to do

e = new Error();
console.log(e.stack);
share|improve this answer
1  
Simple === best –  George Jempty Jan 17 at 20:29
    
Works in mobile apps (built using JQM) as well. –  Samik R May 18 at 8:38

I don't think there's anything built in that you can use however I did find lots of examples of people rolling their own.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, thanks -- the first link there seems like it may do (although the lack of recursion support may render it unworkable). –  David Wolever Feb 26 '09 at 19:04
    
Yeah, I didn't see any that supported recursion on first glance. I'll be curious to see if there's a good solution to that. –  Mark Biek Feb 26 '09 at 19:13
1  
I think the second link should support recursion for Firefox and Opera because it uses the error stack trace rather than manually building one using the arguments variable. I'd love to hear if you find a cross browser solution for the recursion issue (the first article is mine). :) –  Helephant Feb 26 '09 at 23:03
    
Helephant: The second won't work here because, when I catch the exception, it's a "string" (ie, no "e.stack"): foo = function(){ throw "Arg"; } try { foo(); } catch (e) { /* typeof e == "string" */ } Maybe I'm throwing it wrong? (begin obligatory rant about how stupid Javascript tutorials are...) –  David Wolever Mar 2 '09 at 13:43
    
Try to throw an object: throw { name: 'NameOfException', message: 'He's dead, Jim' }. –  Aaron Digulla Mar 25 '11 at 15:09

one way to get a the real stack trace on Firebug is to create a real error like calling an undefined function:

function foo(b){
  if (typeof b !== 'string'){
    // undefined Error type to get the call stack
    throw new ChuckNorrisError("Chuck Norris catches you.");
  }
}

function bar(a){
  foo(a);
}

foo(123);

Or use console.error() followed by a throw statement since console.error() shows the stack trace.

share|improve this answer

You can access the stack (stacktrace in Opera) properties of an Error instance even if you threw it. The thing is, you need to make sure you use throw new Error(string) (don't forget the new instead of throw string.

Example:

try {
    0++;
} catch (e) {
    var myStackTrace = e.stack || e.stacktrace || "";
}
share|improve this answer
    
stacktrace doesn't work in Opera. I can't even find something about it. –  NVI Oct 21 '09 at 19:06
    
@NV: It seems stacktrace isn't on user-created errors so you should do this instead: try { 0++ } catch(e) { myStackTrace=e.stack || e.stacktrace } –  Eli Grey Oct 21 '09 at 19:56
1  
It works, thanks! –  NVI Oct 22 '09 at 8:20

A good (and simple) solution as pointed out in the comments on the original question is to use the stack property of an Error object like so:

function stackTrace() {
    var err = new Error();
    return err.stack;
}

This will generate output like this:

DBX.Utils.stackTrace@http://localhost:49573/assets/js/scripts.js:44
DBX.Console.Debug@http://localhost:49573/assets/js/scripts.js:9
.success@http://localhost:49573/:462
x.Callbacks/c@http://localhost:49573/assets/js/jquery-1.10.2.min.js:4
x.Callbacks/p.fireWith@http://localhost:49573/assets/js/jquery-1.10.2.min.js:4
k@http://localhost:49573/assets/js/jquery-1.10.2.min.js:6
.send/r@http://localhost:49573/assets/js/jquery-1.10.2.min.js:6

Giving the name of the calling function along with the URL and line number, its calling function, and so on.

I have a really elaborate and pretty solution that I have devised for a project I am currently working on and I have extracted and reworked it a bit to be generalized. Here it is:

(function(context){
    // Only global namespace.
    var Console = {
        //Settings
        settings: {
            debug: {
                alwaysShowURL: false,
                enabled: true,
                showInfo: true
            },
            stackTrace: {
                enabled: true,
                collapsed: true,
                ignoreDebugFuncs: true,
                spacing: false
            }
        }
    };

    // String formatting prototype function.
    if (!String.prototype.format) {
        String.prototype.format = function () {
            var s = this.toString(),
                args = typeof arguments[0],
                args = (("string" == args || "number" == args) ? arguments : arguments[0]);
            if (!arguments.length)
                return s;
            for (arg in args)
                s = s.replace(RegExp("\\{" + arg + "\\}", "gi"), args[arg]);
            return s;
        }
    }

    // String repeating prototype function.
    if (!String.prototype.times) {
        String.prototype.times = function () {
            var s = this.toString(),
                tempStr = "",
                times = arguments[0];
            if (!arguments.length)
                return s;
            for (var i = 0; i < times; i++)
                tempStr += s;
            return tempStr;
        }
    }

    // Commonly used functions
    Console.debug = function () {
        if (Console.settings.debug.enabled) {
            var args = ((typeof arguments !== 'undefined') ? Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 0) : []),
                sUA = navigator.userAgent,
                currentBrowser = {
                    firefox: /firefox/gi.test(sUA),
                    webkit: /webkit/gi.test(sUA),
                },
                aLines = Console.stackTrace().split("\n"),
                aCurrentLine,
                iCurrIndex = ((currentBrowser.webkit) ? 3 : 2),
                sCssBlack = "color:black;",
                sCssFormat = "color:{0}; font-weight:bold;",
                sLines = "";

            if (currentBrowser.firefox)
                aCurrentLine = aLines[iCurrIndex].replace(/(.*):/, "$1@").split("@");
            else if (currentBrowser.webkit)
                aCurrentLine = aLines[iCurrIndex].replace("at ", "").replace(")", "").replace(/( \()/gi, "@").replace(/(.*):(\d*):(\d*)/, "$1@$2@$3").split("@");

            // Show info if the setting is true and there's no extra trace (would be kind of pointless).
            if (Console.settings.debug.showInfo && !Console.settings.stackTrace.enabled) {
                var sFunc = aCurrentLine[0].trim(),
                    sURL = aCurrentLine[1].trim(),
                    sURL = ((!Console.settings.debug.alwaysShowURL && context.location.href == sURL) ? "this page" : sURL),
                    sLine = aCurrentLine[2].trim(),
                    sCol;

                if (currentBrowser.webkit)
                    sCol = aCurrentLine[3].trim();

                console.info("%cOn line %c{0}%c{1}%c{2}%c of %c{3}%c inside the %c{4}%c function:".format(sLine, ((currentBrowser.webkit) ? ", column " : ""), ((currentBrowser.webkit) ? sCol : ""), sURL, sFunc),
                             sCssBlack, sCssFormat.format("red"),
                             sCssBlack, sCssFormat.format("purple"),
                             sCssBlack, sCssFormat.format("green"),
                             sCssBlack, sCssFormat.format("blue"),
                             sCssBlack);
            }

            // If the setting permits, get rid of the two obvious debug functions (Console.debug and Console.stackTrace).
            if (Console.settings.stackTrace.ignoreDebugFuncs) {
                // In WebKit (Chrome at least), there's an extra line at the top that says "Error" so adjust for this.
                if (currentBrowser.webkit)
                    aLines.shift();
                aLines.shift();
                aLines.shift();
            }

            sLines = aLines.join(((Console.settings.stackTrace.spacing) ? "\n\n" : "\n")).trim();

            trace = typeof trace !== 'undefined' ? trace : true;
            if (typeof console !== "undefined") {
                for (var arg in args)
                    console.debug(args[arg]);

                if (Console.settings.stackTrace.enabled) {
                    var sCss = "color:red; font-weight: bold;",
                        sTitle = "%c Stack Trace" + " ".times(70);

                    if (Console.settings.stackTrace.collapsed)
                        console.groupCollapsed(sTitle, sCss);
                    else
                        console.group(sTitle, sCss);

                    console.debug("%c" + sLines, "color: #666666; font-style: italic;");

                    console.groupEnd();
                }
            }
        }
    }
    Console.stackTrace = function () {
        var err = new Error();
        return err.stack;
    }

    context.Console = Console;
})(window);

Check it out on GitHub (currently v1.2)! You can use it like Console.debug("Whatever"); and it will, depending on the settings in Console, print the output and a stack trace (or just simple info/nothing extra at all). Here's an example:

Console.js

Make sure to play around with the settings in the Console object! You can add spacing between the lines of the trace and turn it off entirely. Here it is with Console.trace set to false:

No trace

You can even turn off the first bit of info shown (set Console.settings.debug.showInfo to false) or disable debugging entirely (set Console.settings.debug.enabled to false) so you never have to comment out a debug statement again! Just leave them in and this will do nothing.

share|improve this answer

In Google Chrome (version 19.0 and beyond), simply throwing an exception works perfectly. For example:

/* file: code.js, line numbers shown */

188: function fa() {
189:    console.log('executing fa...');
190:    fb();
191: }
192:
193: function fb() {
194:    console.log('executing fb...');
195:    fc()
196: }
197:
198: function fc() {
199:    console.log('executing fc...');
200:    throw 'error in fc...'
201: }
202:
203: fa();

will show the stack trace at the browser's console output:

executing fa...                         code.js:189
executing fb...                         code.js:194
executing fc...                         cdoe.js:199
/* this is your stack trace */
Uncaught error in fc...                 code.js:200
    fc                                  code.js:200
    fb                                  code.js:195
    fa                                  code.js:190
    (anonymous function)                code.js:203

Hope this help.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, good to know, thanks. –  David Wolever Jun 8 '12 at 18:22

With Chrome browser, you can use console.trace method: https://developer.chrome.com/devtools/docs/console-api#consoletraceobject

share|improve this answer

Kind of late to the party, but, here is another solution, which autodetects if arguments.callee is available, and uses new Error().stack if not. Tested in chrome, safari and firefox.

2 variants - stackFN(n) gives you the name of the function n away from the immediate caller, and stackArray() gives you an array, stackArray()[0] being the immediate caller.

Try it out at http://jsfiddle.net/qcP9y/6/

// returns the name of the function at caller-N
// stackFN()  = the immediate caller to stackFN
// stackFN(0) = the immediate caller to stackFN
// stackFN(1) = the caller to stackFN's caller
// stackFN(2) = and so on
// eg console.log(stackFN(),JSON.stringify(arguments),"called by",stackFN(1),"returns",retval);
function stackFN(n) {
    var r = n ? n : 0, f = arguments.callee,avail=typeof f === "function",
        s2,s = avail ? false : new Error().stack;
    if (s) {
        var tl=function(x) { s = s.substr(s.indexOf(x) + x.length);},
        tr = function (x) {s = s.substr(0, s.indexOf(x) - x.length);};
        while (r-- >= 0) {
            tl(")");
        }
        tl(" at ");
        tr("(");
        return s;
    } else {
        if (!avail) return null;
        s = "f = arguments.callee"
        while (r>=0) {
            s+=".caller";
            r--;   
        }
        eval(s);
        return f.toString().split("(")[0].trim().split(" ")[1];
    }
}
// same as stackFN() but returns an array so you can work iterate or whatever.
function stackArray() {
    var res=[],f = arguments.callee,avail=typeof f === "function",
        s2,s = avail ? false : new Error().stack;
    if (s) {
        var tl=function(x) { s = s.substr(s.indexOf(x) + x.length);},
        tr = function (x) {s = s.substr(0, s.indexOf(x) - x.length);};
        while (s.indexOf(")")>=0) {
            tl(")");
            s2= ""+s;
            tl(" at ");
            tr("(");
            res.push(s);
            s=""+s2;
        }
    } else {
        if (!avail) return null;
        s = "f = arguments.callee.caller"
        eval(s);
        while (f) {
            res.push(f.toString().split("(")[0].trim().split(" ")[1]);
            s+=".caller";
            eval(s);
        }
    }
    return res;
}


function apple_makes_stuff() {
    var retval = "iPhones";
    var stk = stackArray();

    console.log("function ",stk[0]+"() was called by",stk[1]+"()");
    console.log(stk);
    console.log(stackFN(),JSON.stringify(arguments),"called by",stackFN(1),"returns",retval);
    return retval;
}



function apple_makes (){
    return apple_makes_stuff("really nice stuff");
}

function apple () {
    return apple_makes();
}

   apple();
share|improve this answer

It is easier to get a stack trace on Firefox than it is on IE but fundamentally here is what you want to do:

Wrap the "problematic" piece of code in a try/catch block:

try {
    // some code that doesn't work
    var t = null;
    var n = t.not_a_value;
}
    catch(e) {
}

If you will examine the contents of the "error" object it contains the following fields:

e.fileName : The source file / page where the issue came from e.lineNumber : The line number in the file/page where the issue arose e.message : A simple message describing what type of error took place e.name : The type of error that took place, in the example above it should be 'TypeError' e.stack : Contains the stack trace that caused the exception

I hope this helps you out.

share|improve this answer
1  
Wrong. He's trying to catch his OWN exceptions. If he throws "asdfg", he'll get string object, not an exception object. He's not trying to catch built-in exceptions. –  Ivan Vučica Mar 16 '09 at 19:19

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