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On the left is the original PNG and on the right are versions reduced to roughly half the orignal size using <img width and height. See [Link removed].

Why does the resized image look so fuzzy in Firefox. Is there anything I can do about it without changing the image file. The fuzziness is particular annoying if the image contains large amounts of math or text.

enter image description here

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The question you referenced is about scaling an image up. There are some helpful links in there nevertheless. I did not find a solution yet, however. –  Frank Seifert May 6 '11 at 23:23
    
@Frank The questions are both about scaling. The direction of the scaling is irrelevant, unless you know something I don't. The same algorithm would be applied and the same fix(if one exists) would affect both cases. –  Su' May 6 '11 at 23:25
    
@Su: Well, the accepted answer there does not work, it makes the result even worse. On developer.mozilla.org/En/CSS/Image-rendering it says for -moz-crisp-edges: "Use this value to avoid upscaled images with sharp edges getting blurry." –  Frank Seifert May 6 '11 at 23:44
4  
Not the answer, although please note that it's mostly not a good idea to let the browser resize images. –  PeeHaa May 7 '11 at 1:46
2  
someone should write a firefox plugin compatibility layer for chrome, then firefox could die in peace –  Sam Watkins Aug 17 '12 at 4:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 19 down vote accepted

There is a longstanding bug ticket filed in Bugzilla related to Firefox image downscaling. You might like to keep an eye on the ticket to track its eventual resolution or contribute a patch yourself if you feel able to.

The best workaround is to use the transform CSS property to apply a tiny rotation to the problem image and force sub-pixel rendering, as detailed in Ryan Wheale's answer.

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I abused bugzilla by nagging them yet again on that ridiculous ticket. –  Sam Watkins Aug 17 '12 at 5:24
    
See my answer below for an easy solution using css3 rotation. –  Ryan Wheale Jan 13 '13 at 21:15
1  
The Firefox bug is fixed. –  To1ne May 31 '13 at 12:47
3  
No, it is not fixed. It is marked as fixed, but it is not fixed. –  George W Bush Feb 12 at 17:31

The image-rendering documentation linked from the Firefox blurs an image when scaled through css or inline style answer which Su' referenced includes instructions for using image-rendering:optimizeQuality (which corrected the issue in my testing on FF4) - example:

enter image description here

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You say correctly image-rendering:optimizeQuality (bilinear resampling) is the default. The Firefox image in the original post also used this resampling technique. Zooming in improves image quality (but also makes the image larger). I get your optimizeQuality 50% image when zooming in once or twice from mine. –  Frank Seifert May 7 '11 at 9:31
1  
image-rendering:optimizeQuality was the only solution that really worked for my problem - jumping/shaking/trembling images that are downscaled –  Prozi Jul 14 at 15:55

I think your answer is in the link from above https://developer.mozilla.org/En/CSS/Image-rendering: 'Currently auto and optimizeQuality are equal by default, both result in bilinear resampling.' 'default value IE8+: bicubic (high quality)'

Next see: http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2007/07/better-image-resizing.html 'When making an image smaller, use bicubic, which has a natural sharpening effect. You want to emphasize the data that remains in the new, smaller image after discarding all that extra detail from the original image.'

I can think of a couple of possible workarounds, but neither are simple:

  1. Resize the image on the server. Either serve it up at half size, and allow Firefox to scale it up to full (which presumably it will be ok at), or have different URLs for the different sizes of image.
  2. You may be able to make this work in the browser with plugins (but the example I found doesn't actually do what you need, so I've removed it).
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Interesting information. Too bad it appears FF only implements bilinear resampling and nearest neighbor :( –  Frank Seifert May 7 '11 at 9:39

I know this is late, but you can trick firefox into rendering the image better by applying a oh-so-slight rotation. I tried to translate() the image to get the same effect... to no avail.

img {
    transform: rotate( .0001deg );
}

Also noteworthy, this same trick can be used to force sub-pixel image rendering in both webkit and firefox. This is useful for very slow animations - best explained by example:

http://jsfiddle.net/ryanwheale/xkxwN/

EDIT: Please please please DO NOT add the above code to your stylesheet!! This forces the browser to do more math than it usually would. Only use it were you really need it! I don't want to be responsible for the above line being included on every haphazardly written stylesheet out there. Instead, your CSS should look more like this:

CSS

.image-scale-hack {
    transform: rotate( .0001deg );
}

Javascript

if( "MozAppearance" in document.documentElement.style ) {
    $('.logo img').addClass('image-scale-hack');
}

Don't talk to me about browser sniffs either. I avoid them at all cost. I borrowed this sniff from yepnope.js and I don't feel bad about it.

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best answer imho –  courtsimas Aug 15 '13 at 15:34
    
You can just use "rotate( 0deg )" and it still fixes the issue. –  shipshape Nov 6 '13 at 18:57
    
At the time I wrote this I tried 0deg and the browser seemed smart enough to know not to do anything... which is why I ended up having to "force" the browser to calculate and render a rotated element. I mean, .0001deg is unnoticeable to the human eye... why not just stick with that and be safe. –  Ryan Wheale Nov 6 '13 at 19:11

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