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Is there a way to use preprocessor keywords inside of a macro? If there is some sort of escape character or something, I am not aware of it.

For example, I want to make a macro that expands to this:

#ifdef DEBUG
    printf("FOO%s","BAR");
#else
    log("FOO%s","BAR");
#endif

from this:

PRINT("FOO%s","BAR");

Is this possible, or am I just crazy (and I will have to type out the preprocessor conditional every time I want to show a debug message)?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can't do that directly, no, but you can define the PRINT macro differently depending on whether DEBUG is defined:

#ifdef DEBUG
    #define PRINT(...) printf(__VA_ARGS__)
#else 
    #define PRINT(...) log(__VA_ARGS__)
#endif
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Ah. I knew it had to be possible somehow, but I was just looking at the wrong end. Thank you. –  Matt Bell May 7 '11 at 1:56
    
@James McNellis: This will create an error, PRINT("FOO%s","BAR"); gets expanded to log("FOO%s","BAR");;, for example. –  nightcracker May 7 '11 at 1:57
1  
@equality: C89/90 does not have variadic macros, no. –  James McNellis May 7 '11 at 1:58
1  
@nightcracker - While ugly, that's not by any means an error. –  Chris Lutz May 7 '11 at 1:58
    
@nightcracker: I already noticed that and removed the extraneous ;. –  James McNellis May 7 '11 at 1:58

Just do it the other way around:

#ifdef DEBUG
    #define PRINT printf
#else
    #define PRINT log
#endif
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You're not crazy, but you're approaching this from the wrong angle. You can't have a macro expand to have more preprocessor arguments, but you can conditionally define a macro based on preprocessor arguments:

#ifdef DEBUG
# define DEBUG_PRINT printf
#else
# define DEBUG_PRINT log
#endif

If you have variadic macros, you could do #define DEBUG_PRINTF(...) func(__VA_ARGS__) instead. Either way works. The second lets you use function pointers, but I can't imagine why you'd need that for this purpose.

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