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I need to use Signal to write UNIX Interprocess communication program in C. I want a parent process and child process to write to a same file. The result only show parent written text. I can use either BSD or System V. Please help

#include <stdio.h>     /* basic I/O routines.   */
#include <unistd.h>    /* define fork(), etc.   */
#include <sys/types.h> /* define pid_t, etc.    */
#include <sys/wait.h>  /* define wait(), etc.   */
#include <signal.h>

int myFlag = 0;
void myHandler(int);
int child_pid;

int main()
{
    //oldmask = sigblock(sigmask(SIGUSR1));

    sighold(SIGUSR1);
    sighold(SIGINT);
    /* critical region */
    signal (SIGUSR1, myHandler);
    sigrelse(SIGUSR1);
    sigrelse(SIGINT);
    child_pid = fork();


    if (child_pid==0) {

        for ( ; ; ) {
            while(myFlag == 0)
                sigpause(0);
            sigblock (sigmask(SIGUSR1));
            myFlag = 0; 
            FILE *fp=fopen("test","w");
            fwrite("child",1,6,fp);
            fclose(fp); 
            kill(getppid(),SIGUSR1);


        }       
    }  
    if (child_pid>0){
        FILE *fp;
        fp=fopen("test","w");
        fwrite("parent",1,6,fp);
        fclose(fp);

        for ( ; ; ) {
            while(myFlag == 0)
                sigpause(0);
            sigblock (sigmask(SIGUSR1));
            myFlag = 0; 
            fp=fopen("test","w");
            fwrite("parent",1,6,fp);
            fclose(fp); 
        }           
        kill(child_pid, SIGUSR1);
        //kill ()-child_pid ;
    }   

    exit(0);
}

void myHandler(int sigNo) {
    myFlag = 1;
    //signal (SIGUSR1, myHandler);
}
share|improve this question
    
Try not to indent your code by 10-12 spaces - it makes it very hard to read and vanishes of the RHS of the page. At most, 8 spaces should be the maximum; I use 4 spaces though there are some who use 3 spaces. You'll find some books using only a couple of spaces, but they are constrained by the print layout... –  Jonathan Leffler May 7 '11 at 4:18
    
Also, sighold() and sigrelse() are obsolescent functions in POSIX. New code (such as yours) should not use it. It is also moderately pointless to use them as you do, IMNSHO. –  Jonathan Leffler May 7 '11 at 4:20

2 Answers 2

You should start by opening the file in append mode rather than write mode:

fp = fopen("test", "a");

That will position the write position of fp at the end of file rather than the beginning. When you open with "w", you truncate the file and start writing from position 0:

w or wb
Truncate to zero length or create file for writing.

Then you might want to think about file locking to keep the two processes from writing to the file at the same time.

Also, your child process writes out the nul terminator:

fwrite("child", 1, 6, fp);

but your parent process doesn't:

fwrite("parent", 1, 6, fp);

That may or may not be your intention but it does look odd.

share|improve this answer
    
Bother children who needed tucking into bed...you made most of the points I was going to make. –  Jonathan Leffler May 7 '11 at 4:34
    
It would be sensible to factor the code that opens, writes and closes the file into a single function. It could be passed the file name; it should be passed the string; it could use 'fprintf(fp, "%s\n", str); to write the string with a newline after it, which would improve the readability of the file. –  Jonathan Leffler May 7 '11 at 4:36
    
This is only a small part of the problem. –  Omnifarious May 7 '11 at 4:38

Your logic is flawed. The parent process does not signal the child process before it waits for the child process to signal it. The child process waits for the parent process to signal it before writing the file and signaling the parent process.

This means after you write the file in the parent both the parent and child are stuck in busy loops waiting for the other one to do something.

Also, while I don't think this is a problem in your code since the call to sigpause(0); should cause the compiler to believe that global variables may have changed and need to be reloaded, in other situations you might want to declare myFlag as volatile int myFlag;. This forces the compiler to read or write its value from memory every time you reference it.

Lastly, of course, your programs will simply re-write over the same bytes repeatedly because you open the files in "w" (write) mode instead of "a" (append) mode.

Here's a program that accomplishes what you want using POSIX standard calls and techniques instead of the old deprecated obsolete calls you were using:

#include <stdio.h>     /* basic I/O routines.   */
#include <unistd.h>    /* define fork(), etc.   */
#include <sys/types.h> /* define pid_t, etc.    */
#include <sys/wait.h>  /* define wait(), etc.   */
#include <signal.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

volatile sig_atomic_t myFlag = 0;
void myHandler(int);
int child_pid;

int main()
{
    signal (SIGUSR1, myHandler);
    child_pid = fork();

    if (child_pid==0) {
       for ( ; ; ) {
          while(myFlag == 0)
             ;
          {
             sigset_t oldmask;
             sigset_t usr1;
             sigemptyset(&oldmask);
             sigemptyset(&usr1);
             sigaddset(&usr1, SIGUSR1);
             sigprocmask(SIG_BLOCK, &usr1, &oldmask);
             myFlag = 0;
             sigprocmask(SIG_SETMASK, &oldmask, NULL);
          }
          FILE *fp=fopen("test","a");
          fwrite("child\n",1,6,fp);
          fclose(fp);
          kill(getppid(),SIGUSR1);
       }
    }
    if (child_pid>0){
       FILE *fp;
       fp=fopen("test","a");
       fwrite("parent\n",1,7,fp);
       fclose(fp);

       for ( ; ; ) {
          kill(child_pid, SIGUSR1);
          //kill ()-child_pid ;
          while(myFlag == 0)
             ;
          {
             sigset_t oldmask;
             sigset_t usr1;
             sigemptyset(&oldmask);
             sigemptyset(&usr1);
             sigaddset(&usr1, SIGUSR1);
             sigprocmask(SIG_BLOCK, &usr1, &oldmask);
             myFlag = 0;
             sigprocmask(SIG_SETMASK, &oldmask, NULL);
          }
          fp=fopen("test","a");
          fwrite("parent\n",1,7,fp);
          fclose(fp);
       }
    }

    exit(0);
}

void myHandler(int sigNo) {
    myFlag = 1;
    //signal (SIGUSR1, myHandler);
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1: Good point that the parent kill() call is outside the loop. –  Jonathan Leffler May 7 '11 at 4:46

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