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Lets say I have a php generated javasrcipt file that has the user's name, id number and email adress that is currently logged in. Would a simply document.location.href look up prevent remotes sites from determining the currently logged in user?

Would this be safe?

if(window.document.location.hostname == 'domain.com')
var user = {
          name:'me',
          id:234243,
          email:'email@email.com'
};
else alert('Sorry you may not request this info cross sites.');

Initially it appears safe to me.

EDIT: I had initially thought this was obvious but I am using cookies to determine the currently logged in user. I am just trying to prevent cross domain access to the users info. For example if the if statement was removed malicious site A could embed the javascript file and access the users info. By adding the if statement the user js object should never appear. Cross site ajax isn't supported therefore only through javascript insertion could the malicious site attempt to determine the currently logged in user.

EDIT 2: Would checking my http_refer using php be safe? What if caching is also enabled for the client? For example if the user visits my site A where the user script is downloaded and then later visits site B malicious site would the script be cached, therefore bypassing the need for the server to check the user's http_refer?

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1  
why need to put user info into javascript? php is server-side and already secured. anyway you might wanna use https :) –  dragonjet May 7 '11 at 4:54
    
I am setting up a live ajax application and it is there for convenience. –  Liam William May 7 '11 at 5:03
    
then you just need to generate, re-fetch the user_info again on the ajax-loaded page. now that i know that you will use ajax to pass the user variable, then it is NOT safe. –  dragonjet May 7 '11 at 5:32
    
Its not clear what attack you are trying to prevent. If this is CSRF, then answer is: NO. –  Rook May 7 '11 at 19:59
    
@Rock Then how would you advise fixing it? –  Liam William May 7 '11 at 20:25
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3 Answers

You really just don't want to try something like this. Suppose I'm running an evil site; what do I do?

<script>
RegExp.prototype.test = function() { return true; };
</script>
<script src="http://yoursite.example.com/dynamicjs.php"></script>
<script>
alert("Look at the data I stole: " + user);
</script>
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How would you advise linking to the script? Is there any workaround to prevent this? –  Liam William May 7 '11 at 20:26
    
I have changed the conditional to window.document.location.hostname == 'domain.com' and I am considering checking http_referrer. –  Liam William May 7 '11 at 21:52
    
Checking the referrer server-side is safe. I would be suspicious of anything in JS, although I can't think of anything off the top of my head that would break your check. –  servn May 8 '11 at 3:33
    
Would caching allow a malicious site to bypass the referrer check? For example, user visits my site caching the script containing the users info. Then the user visits a malicious site which queries for the script which is already in the users cache, therefore there would be no response sent to my server checking for http_referrer. Would I have to disable caching for the script containing the users info or is there another solution? –  Liam William May 8 '11 at 3:45
    
I don't think so... but really, the most reliable thing is just not include sensitive information in .js files. If you're using php, you should be able to just server-side include the script into your main pages. –  servn May 8 '11 at 18:22
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You're basically saying "here's the keys to the bank vault, here's the guard's schedule, and here's the staff schedule. But hey, if you're not from the Acme Security Company, pretend I didn't give this to you".

"oh, sure, no problem, lemme just pretend to shred this note and go rent a large truck haul away your vault contents with"

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No, what you have there is not "safe" in that it will reveal those details to anyone requesting the HTML page containing that JavaScript. All they have to do is look at the text (including script) returned by the server.

What it comes down to is this: Either you have authenticated the other end to your satisfaction, in which case you don't need the check in the JavaScript, or you haven't, in which case you don't want to output the details to the response at all. There's no purpose whatsoever to that client-side if statement. Try this: http://jsbin.com/aboze5 It'll say you can't request the data; then do a View Source, and note that you can see the data.

Instead, you need to check the origin of the request server-side and not output those details in the script at all if the origin of the request is not authenticated.

Update 1: Below you said:

I was specifically trying to determine if document.location.href could be falsified.

Yes, document.location can be falsified through shadowing the document symbol (although you might be able to detect that if you tried hard enough):

(function() {
    var document; // Shadow the symbol

    document = {
      location: {
        href: "http://example.com/foo.html"
      }
    };

    alert("document.location.href = " + document.location.href);
})();

Live copy

Cross-domain checks must happen within the browser's internals, nothing at the level of your JavaScript code can do it securely and robustly.

But that really doesn't matter. Even if it couldn't be falsified, the quoted example code doesn't protect the data. By the time the client-side check is done, the data has already been sent to the client.

Update 2: You've added a note about checking the HTTP_REFERER (sic) header (yes, it really is misspelled). Sadly, no, you can't trust that. HTTP_REFERER can be spoofed, and separately it can be suppressed.


Off-topic: You're probably already doing this, but: When transferring personal details you've promised to keep confidential (I don't know whether you have, but hopefully so), use HTTPS (e.g., SSL). But it's important to remember that while HTTPS ensures that data cannot be read in transit, it does nothing to ensure that the origin of the request is authenticated. E.g., you know the conversation is secure (within reason and current practice), but you don't necessarily know who you're talking to. There's where authentication comes into it.

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But wouldn't you need access to the client computer therefore providing a surplus of potential security threats? I thought javascript prevented cross site ajax. –  Liam William May 7 '11 at 5:01
    
@Lime: And if someone just requests that URL directly? From a browser or crawler/spider? Or via curl, or wget? Your code is literally just initializing a user object from an object literal, or not, based on the location. But the object literal is there for anyone to look at regardless of whether you use it to initialize user or not. –  T.J. Crowder May 7 '11 at 5:03
    
I have a php auth system set up. It uses cookies to validate if the user is logged in. If someone requests the script with wget I would respond with either a blank page or empty user js object. Specifically I am using Kohana. I am just trying to prevent cross domain access to the currently logged in user's info. –  Liam William May 7 '11 at 5:05
    
@Lime: What it comes down to is this: Either you have authenticated the other end to your satisfaction, in which case you don't need the check in the JavaScript, or you haven't, in which case you don't want to output the details to the response at all. There's no purpose at all to that client-side if statement. Try this: jsbin.com/aboze5 It'll say you can't request the data; then do a View Source. –  T.J. Crowder May 7 '11 at 5:11
    
I was specifically trying to determine if document.location.href could be falsified. –  Liam William May 7 '11 at 5:13
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