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If here's some cross-platform C/C++ code should be compiled on Mac OS X, iOS, Linux, Windows, how can I detect them reliably during preprocessor process?

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@Cody, @Jeff I'm sorry for my mistake. My question includes Windows and Linux –  Eonil May 7 '11 at 11:12
    
possible duplicate of C++ compiling on Windows and Linux: ifdef switch –  Cory Klein Sep 18 '13 at 21:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 226 down vote accepted

There are predefined macros that are used by most compilers, you can find the list [here]. GCC compiler predefined macros can be found [here]. Here is an example for gcc:

#ifdef _WIN32
   //define something for Windows (32-bit and 64-bit, this part is common)
   #ifdef _WIN64
      //define something for Windows (64-bit only)
   #endif
#elif __APPLE__
    #include "TargetConditionals.h"
    #if TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR
         // iOS Simulator
    #elif TARGET_OS_IPHONE
        // iOS device
    #elif TARGET_OS_MAC
        // Other kinds of Mac OS
    #else
        // Unsupported platform
    #endif
#elif __linux
    // linux
#elif __unix // all unices not caught above
    // Unix
#elif __posix
    // POSIX
#endif

This defined macroses depends on compiler that you are going to use.

The _WIN64 #ifdef can be nested into the _WIN32 #ifdef because _WIN32 is defined when targeting Windows, not only the x86 version. This prevents code duplication if some includes are common to both.

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The OP specifically asked about Mac OS X versus iOS –  Paul R May 7 '11 at 9:12
2  
@Paul, "code should be compiled on Mac OS X, iOS, Linux, Windows" –  Evgeny Gavrin May 7 '11 at 9:21
    
@Paul, @Evgeny I'm sorry for my mistake. My question includes Windows and Linux. –  Eonil May 7 '11 at 11:11
5  
There is more... it should be #if TARGET_OS_IPHONE rather than #ifdef since TARGET_OS_IPHONE is defined as 0 on a Mac. –  Steven Lu Jun 21 '12 at 5:45
2  
According to SourceForge _WIN32 is defined for both 32 und 64bit versions of Windows, so shouldn't _WIN64 be placed before _WIN32? –  MFH Jul 7 '12 at 10:52

As Jake points out, TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR is a subset of TARGET_OS_IPHONE.

Also, TARGET_OS_IPHONE is a subset of TARGET_OS_MAC.

So a better approach might be:

#ifdef _WIN64
   //define something for Windows (64-bit)
#elif _WIN32
   //define something for Windows (32-bit)
#elif __APPLE__
    #include "TargetConditionals.h"
    #if TARGET_OS_IPHONE && TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR
        // define something for simulator   
    #elif TARGET_OS_IPHONE
        // define something for iphone  
    #else
        #define TARGET_OS_OSX 1
        // define something for OSX
    #endif
#elif __linux
    // linux
#elif __unix // all unices not caught above
    // Unix
#elif __posix
    // POSIX
#endif
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