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I have a legacy class that contains a new() call to instantiate a LoginContext():

public class TestedClass {
  public LoginContext login(String user, String password) {
    LoginContext lc = new LoginContext("login", callbackHandler);
  }
}

I want to test this class using Mockito to mock the LoginContext as it requires that the JAAS security stuff be set up before instantiating but I'm not sure how to do that without changing the login() method to externalise the LoginContext. Is it possible using Mockito to mock the LoginContext class?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

For the future I would recommend Eran Harel answer (refactoring moving new to factory that can be mocked). But if you don't want to change the original source code, use very handy and unique feature: spies. From the documentation:

You can create spies of real objects. When you use the spy then the real methods are called (unless a method was stubbed).

Real spies should be used carefully and occasionally, for example when dealing with legacy code.

In your case you should write:

TestedClass tc = spy(new TestedClass());
LoginContext lcMock = mock(LoginContext.class);
when(tc.login(anyString(), anyString())).thenReturn(lcMock);
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This was exactly what I was looking for, thanks Tomasz. The extra part at the bottom of the doco about doReturn was especially helpful. –  bwobbones May 8 '11 at 13:31
    
any alternative for versions less than 1.8 –  pseudoCoder May 27 at 23:32

You can use a factory to create the login context. Then you can mock the factory and return whatever you want for your test.

public class TestedClass {
  private final LoginContextFactory loginContextFactory;

  public TestedClass(final LoginContextFactory loginContextFactory) {
    this.loginContextFactory = loginContextFactory;
  }

  public LoginContext login(String user, String password) {
    LoginContext lc = loginContextFactory.createLoginContext();
  }
}

public interface LoginContextFactory {
  public LoginContext createLoginContext();
}
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Not that I know of, but what about doing something like this when you create an instance of TestedClass that you want to test:

TestedClass toTest = new TestedClass() {
    public LoginContext login(String user, String password) {
        //return mocked LoginContext
    }
};

Another option would be to use Mockito to create an instance of TestedClass and let the mocked instance return a LoginContext.

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I am all for Eran Harel's solution, and in cases that isn't possible, Tomasz Nurkiewicz's suggestion for spying is excellent. However, it's worth noting that there are situations where neither would apply. E.g., if the login method was a bit "beefer":

public class TestedClass {
    public LoginContext login(String user, String password) {
        LoginContext lc = new LoginContext("login", callbackHandler);
        lc.doThis();
        lc.doThat();
    }
}

... and this was old code that could not be refactored to extract the initialization of a new LoginContext to it's own method and apply one of the aforementioned solutions.

For completeness' sake, it's worth mentioning a third technique - using PowerMock to inject the mock object when the new operator is called. PowerMock isn't a silver bullet, though. It works by applying byte-code manipulation on the classes it mocks, which could be dodgy practice if the tested classes employ byte code manipulation or reflection, and, at least from my personal experience, has been known to introduce a performance hit to the test. Then again, if there are no other options, the only option must be the good option:

@RunWith(PowerMockRunner.class)
@PrepareForTest(TestedClass.class)
public class TestedClassTest {

    @Test
    public void testLogin() {
        LoginContext lcMock = mock(LoginContext.class);
        whenNew(LoginContext.class).withArguments(anyString(), anyString()).thenReturn(lcMock);
        TestedClass tc = new TestedClass();
        tc.login ("something", "something else");
        // test the login's logic
    }
}
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