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My code is...

public static void AssertNotNull<T>(string name, T val) {
    if (val == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException(String.Format("{0} must not be null", name));
}

Resharper is recommending...

public static void AssertNotNull<T>(string name, T val) {
    if (Equals(val, default(T)))
        throw new ArgumentNullException(String.Format("{0} must not be null", name));
}
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It is things like that which make resharper worth the money ten times over. –  Matt Briggs Feb 26 '09 at 19:30
1  
Interesting question +1, just one thing could you please put more info into the title to make it easier to find next time say "Why is resharper recommending replacing val == null with Equals(val,default(T))" Thanks. –  David Waters Feb 26 '09 at 19:42
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6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Because it doesn't know if T is a value type or reference type, so it makes the code work with both.

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so if i wanted to do the following to make sure it is a ref type, what do I put for XXX? public static void AssertNotNull<T>(string name, T val) where T : XXX –  JeremyWeir Feb 26 '09 at 19:28
    
nm Michael Meadows answered that part –  JeremyWeir Feb 26 '09 at 19:29
1  
I actually disagree with Resharper in this case if that's why it's giving that error. Think about it, if T is an int, and the value IS actually 0 and SHOULD be zero, it will throw an exception, whereas if you check for null, it wouldn't throw an exception. –  BFree Feb 26 '09 at 19:32
    
msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6b0scde8(VS.80).aspx for more info as well –  Bearddo Feb 26 '09 at 19:32
    
The suggestion is definitely wrong, but it does need to flag this, because it is a static code error. An API shouldn't allow a value type to call a method call AssertNotNull. –  Michael Meadows Feb 26 '09 at 20:43
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I second Berado's answer, but would add that you can prevent this by adding the constraint below:

public static void AssertNotNull<T>(string name, T val) where T : class
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thanks, that makes a lot of sense –  JeremyWeir Feb 26 '09 at 19:30
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This obviously isn't what you want in this instance, but it's just trying to be helpful, making sure that you don't introduce a bug by forgetting that reference types can be used for T. Like @Michael Meadows said, you probably want to add the class constraint to T.

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Those two methods are not equivalent. The first one allows AssertNotNull( "foo", 0 ) while the second throws. I think Resharper is being overzealous in this case.

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Your point is on spot. Resharper flags it as a warn (yellow) by default. It just wants to warn you that this method won't work as expected for all possible inputs. –  Michael Meadows Feb 26 '09 at 19:32
    
er, one revision: AssertNotNull("foo", 0) will not throw an exception, it will act like it is a null value, since the default for int is 0, so therefore Equals(val, default(T)) evaluates to true. –  Michael Meadows Feb 26 '09 at 19:38
    
I meant that "throw new ArgumentNullException" will be run in the second method. Do you agree? –  Greg Feb 26 '09 at 20:10
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I suppose because T could be a non-reference type.

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if you know that T will always be a class then add a where clause to say so then your origional code will be OK.

public static void AssertNotNull<T>(string name, T val)
    where T : class
    {
        if (val == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException(String.Format("{0} must not be null", name));
    }
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